Roundup: Stripping for women’s rights

Plus: Do women know when to stop talking and start doing?

Topics: Broadsheet, Muslim Women, Love and Sex,

Quit your whining, woman! Today, in an article with the headline “Enough Talk, Already,” Laura Sessions Stepp gives voice to a handful of experts who say that “while males tend to think their way through problems, females tend to talk their way through.” There might be unfortunate emotional consequences to either approach when done to the extreme, but the piece mostly focuses on the negative consequences of co-rumination among female friends. The general gist of the experts’ advice: Talk issues over and then get to problem solving. That seems reasonable advice for either sex.

Me want caveman. After studying data from fossil hominin skulls as well as the facial coordinates of modern humans, researchers have concluded that evolution has favored males with a “caveman face” (in other words, a short “upper face”). That means women are most attracted to men with faces that are scrunched between the brow and upper lip, say researchers. Brad Pitt and Will Smith are examples of men with “mini mugs,” they say. So is this guy.

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“Women are born to shop, experts say.” Eesh, that headline is a tad misleading (especially paired with a photo of a woman kicking up her red-heeled feet next to several boutique-style shopping bags). The article actually reports on a study showing that women are more adept than men at shopping for food, particularly high-energy foods. Women have their gatherer ancestors to thank, researchers say. The Daily Mail reports, “While men developed the acute sense of direction needed for hunting, women mastered the art of gathering food such as fruits and berries.” Not all experts are in agreement, though. Australia’s the Age quotes Monica Minnegal, an anthropology professor at Melbourne University: “To reduce everything to what happened on the savanna way back then is, for me, problematic.”

What not to wear on a job interview: A veil, it seems. Reuters reports that it’s difficult for Muslim women the world over who wear a full-face veil to score a job. Abdullah Naser, manager of a post office in Dubai, said: “Women in niqabs do not sit at the counter. They take administrative jobs. Clients need to know who they are talking to.”

Taking it off to protest the “stripping” of women’s rights. Thirteen women from southwest Nepal were arrested today for publicly stripping to their skivvies in an attempt to get the government to put a halt to their poor community’s tradition of forcing young women into prostitution. They called for free education and donations of land. “We have been stripped by society every day, so why should I be ashamed to press for our demands?” 40-year-old Rukmini Badi told Reuters.

Tracy Clark-Flory

Tracy Clark-Flory is a staff writer at Salon. Follow @tracyclarkflory on Twitter and Facebook.

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