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Why liberals are like pagans who practiced human sacrifice.

Topics: War Room, Liberalism,

From a column at the conservative Web site Townhall.com, written by Matt Barber, who is an associate dean at Liberty University School of Law:

[T]oday’s liberalism is largely a sanitized retread of an antiquated mythology — one that significantly predates the only truly progressive movement: biblical Christianity… Although they’ve now assumed a more contemporary flair, the fundamentals of Baal worship remain alive and well today. The principal pillars of Baalism were child sacrifice, sexual immorality (both heterosexual and homosexual) and pantheism (reverence of creation over the Creator).

Ritualistic Baal worship, in sum, looked a little like this: Adults would gather around the altar of Baal. Infants would then be burned alive as a sacrificial offering to the deity. Amid horrific screams and the stench of charred human flesh, congregants — men and women alike — would engage in bisexual orgies. The ritual of convenience was intended to produce economic prosperity by prompting Baal to bring rain for the fertility of “mother earth.”

The natural consequences of such behavior — pregnancy and childbirth — and the associated financial burdens of “unplanned parenthood” were easily offset. One could either choose to engage in homosexual conduct or — with child sacrifice available on demand — could simply take part in another fertility ceremony to “terminate” the unwanted child.

Modern liberalism deviates little from its ancient predecessor. While its macabre rituals have been sanitized with flowery and euphemistic terms of art, its core tenets and practices remain eerily similar.

A hat-tip to my friend Steve Benen, who has more thoughts on this over at his blog.

Alex Koppelman is a staff writer for Salon.

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