British hostage in Iraq freed

A man abducted in Baghdad by armed militants is let go after 2 and a half years in captivity

Topics: Iraq war, Iraq, Terrorism, England, British Election,

A British man abducted in Baghdad by armed militants disguised as policemen was freed Wednesday, alive and remarkably well after 2 1/2 years in captivity, the British government said.

Computer consultant Peter Moore, who was handed over to Iraqi authorities Wednesday morning, is believed to be the only survivor of a group of five Britons abducted in a daring raid outside Iraq’s Finance Ministry in May 2007. Moore was taken along with his four British bodyguards.

Foreign Secretary David Miliband said Moore, 36, was in good health at the British Embassy in Baghdad.

“I have just had a very moving conversation with Peter himself,” Miliband said. He said Moore was “in a remarkable frame of mind” given his ordeal.

“He is obviously, to put it mildly, absolutely delighted at his release.”

Miliband said Moore would soon return home to Britain. He said Britain had not made concessions to the hostage-takers, but would not say whether a deal had been done between the Iraqi government and the kidnappers. He said Moore’s release was the result of the reconciliation process between Iraq’s government and armed groups willing to renounce violence.

“It is the result of some very hard work on the part of the Iraqi authorities,” Miliband said.

Moore’s father, Graeme, said the family was looking forward to having him back.

“We are so relieved and we just want to get him home, back now to his family and friends,” he said. “I’m breaking down, I’m just so overjoyed for the lad. It’s been such a long haul.”

Hopes for Moore’s release grew after the militant group behind the kidnapping, Asaib Ahl al-Haq, or League of the Righteous, promised in August to lay down its weapons and join the political process.

The kidnappers had demanded the release of several Shiite militiamen held by U.S. forces, including the group’s leader, Sheikh Qais al-Khazali, in exchange for the hostages. Al-Khazali’s status was unclear Wednesday, although the BBC reported he had recently been handed over to Iraqi authorities by U.S. forces.

Miliband called on the hostage-takers to release the body of Alan McMenemy, one of the four bodyguards kidnapped with Moore. British officials said earlier this year that they believed McMenemy, 34, was dead, but have yet to identify his body.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown said Moore’s release was “wonderful news,” but also demanded the return of McMenemy.



“We have believed for some time that he has been killed, and his family have been told our view of his likely fate,” Miliband said. “I call today again in the strongest terms for the hostage-takers to return Alan’s body as soon as possible.”

The remains of the three other Britons — Alec MacLachlan, 30, Jason Swindlehurst, 38, and Jason Creswell, 39 — were returned to Britain earlier this year. It is not clear how they died, although both Swindlehurst and Creswell had multiple gunshot wounds.

“For Peter’s family, the pain and the anguish is over. For the other families it endures,” Miliband said.

British authorities have not said how they communicated with the kidnappers, but have received information about the hostages over the years.

A videotape showing Moore in reasonable health was delivered to the British Embassy in Baghdad in March, and British officials have said since then they believed he was still alive.

The four security contractors worked for Canadian security company GardaWorld protecting Moore, an IT consultant working for BearingPoint, a U.S.-based management consulting firm.

 

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 10
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Bet Me" by Jennifer Crusie

    A contemporary romantic comedy set to Elvis Costello and lots of luxurious and sinful sugary treats.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Welcome to Temptation" by Jennifer Crusie

    Another of Crusie's romantic comedies, this one in the shadow of an ostentatiously phallic water tower.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "A Gentleman Undone" by Cecilia Grant

    A Regency romance with beautifully broken people and some seriously steamy sex.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Black Silk" by Judith Ivory

    A beautifully written, exquisitely slow-building Regency; the plot is centered on a box with some very curious images, as Edward Gorey might say.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "For My Lady's Heart" by Laura Kinsale

    A medieval romance, the period piece functions much like a dystopia, with the courageous lady and noble knight struggling to find happiness despite the authoritarian society.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Sweet Disorder" by Rose Lerner

    A Regency that uses the limitations on women of the time to good effect; the main character is poor and needs to sell her vote ... or rather her husband's vote. But to sell it, she needs to get a husband first ...   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Frenemy of the People" by Nora Olsen

    Clarissa is sitting at an awards banquet when she suddenly realizes she likes pictures of Kimye for both Kim and Kanye and she is totally bi. So she texts to all her friends, "I am totally bi!" Drama and romance ensue ... but not quite with who she expects. I got an advanced copy of this YA lesbian romance, and I’d urge folks to reserve a copy; it’s a delight.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "The Slightest Provocation" by Pam Rosenthal

    A separated couple works to reconcile against a background of political intrigue; sort of "His Gal Friday" as a spy novel set in the Regency.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Again" by Kathleen Gilles Seidel

    Set among workers on a period soap opera, it manages to be contemporary and historical both at the same time.   Read the whole essay.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>