Obama urges base against progress repeal

The President tells voters that his achievements "can be rolled back" by the Republicans

Topics: Barack Obama, 2010 Elections, Bank Reform, Democratic Party, Republican Party, Tea Parties,

President Barack Obama implored voters on Saturday to resist a Republican tide, warning that if the GOP prevails in Tuesday’s midterm elections all the progress of his first two years in office “can be rolled back.”

That would be just fine, said Rep. John Boehner, in line to become the new speaker if Republicans take the House, as expected. He declared, “Americans are demanding a new way forward in Washington.”

Embarking on a four-state weekend campaign dash, Obama acknowledged the difficulties Democrats face — the distinct chance of losing their comfortable majority in the House and possibly the Senate, as well as several governors’ seats.

All four weekend stops are in states Obama carried in 2008 — Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Illinois and Ohio. But Democratic candidates for the Senate, House and governorships are struggling in these places and elsewhere, and Obama is making a last-ditch plea for the party’s core supporters not to abandon them.

“It is difficult here in Pennsylvania, it is difficult all across the country,” Obama told several hundred campaign volunteers at Temple University in Philadelphia, a Democratic-leaning city he has visited often.

The weekend tour marks the president’s last campaign swing of the campaign season, with Republicans expecting big victories on Tuesday. Obama’s sagging popularity has limited his ability to save Democratic candidates, and his legislative agenda may be deeply complicated if the GOP takes over the House, as many expect.

Unless Democratic voters turn out in big numbers, Obama said in a seven-minute talk, all the progress made in the past two years “can be rolled back.”

Several of Pennsylvania’s U.S. House Democrats are battling for survival, as is the Senate nominee, Joe Sestak.

Republicans expect to win the governor’s seat, as two-term Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell is term-limited.

Obama planned later stops Saturday in Bridgeport, Conn., and Chicago. He will headline a campaign rally Sunday in Cleveland before returning to Washington for Halloween with his family.

In his weekly radio and Internet address, Obama said it’s time to put aside partisanship. But his appeal for unity included jabs at GOP leaders for comments he called troubling.

Boehner, currently the House minority leader, “actually said that ‘this is not the time for compromise,’” Obama said. He said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky “said his main goal after this election is simply to win the next one.”



“I know that we’re in the final days of a campaign,” Obama said in his weekly address. “So it’s not surprising that we’re seeing this heated rhetoric. That’s politics. But when the ballots are cast and the voting is done, we need to put this kind of partisanship side — win, lose or draw.”

Boehner, in the weekly Republican radio address, said Obama has failed to deliver the change he promised — and American workers have lost jobs as a result of White House policies. The Ohio Republican spoke up for a GOP pledges to cut spending and keep taxes at current levels.

“This is a new way forward that hasn’t been tried in Washington yet,” Boehner said. “It’s a break from the direction in which President Obama has taken our country. And frankly, it’s also a break from the direction in which Republicans were headed when Americans last entrusted us with the reins of government. The American people are in charge, and they deserve nothing less.”

Candidates were everywhere on Saturday, making last-weekend pitches for support.

Party stars were out in force, too.

Former President Bill Clinton, campaigning for Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland’s re-election, called the Republican pledge “a joke.” He said, “Their deal sounds good but it doesn’t work. … Our ideas work better than theirs.”

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and her husband, Todd, were to appear for Republican Senate candidate John Raese at a big rally in Charleston, W.Va.

In many races, vast numbers of the electorate had already made their choices. In Ohio, where Democrats could lose as many as six House seats, more than 721,000 votes had been cast. California officials already had in hand almost 2.5 million ballots, and Florida officials had almost 1.7 million.

Both parties worked vigorously to bank supporters’ votes early. In all, more than 13.5 million votes had been cast early, either at ballot boxes that opened early or by mail. Four years ago, during the last non-presidential election, some 19 million voters cast ballots before Election Day.

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