Selling Zionism in the 1920s

The Palestine Poster Project reveals attempts to entice settlers into what is now Israel

Topics: Imprint, History, Israel, ,

Selling Zionism in the 1920s
This article originally appeared on Imprint.

ImprintDan Walsh’s incredibly rich Palestine Poster Project Archives includes much in the way of protest, but it also contains a trove of rare Zionist/Israeli posters from the 1920s through the ’50s, largely before partition. The ones excerpted here are from the Mahmoud Darwish Memorial Gallery, which includes a collection of Zionist Worker agency posters calling for increased development of Palestine.

The affairs of the workers of Eretz Israel should be in the hands of the workers of Eretz Israel, 1935.

To experience the role of posters in the birth, growing pains, and ultimate conflict, this is perhaps the best online resource. Here’s what Walsh collects: 1) international artists and agencies; 2) Zionist and Israeli artists and agencies; 3) Palestinian nationalist artists and agencies; 4) Arab and Muslim artists and agencies. And here is what he says about his collection of over 6,700 posters:

I first began collecting Palestine posters when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Morocco in the mid-1970s. By 1980 I had acquired about 300 Palestine posters. A small grant awarded with the support of the late Dr. Edward Said allowed me to organize them into an educational slideshow to further the “third goal” of the Peace Corps: to promote a better understanding of other peoples on the part of Americans. Over the ensuing years, while running my design company, Liberation Graphics, the number of internationally published Palestine posters I acquired steadily grew. Today the archives include some 3,000 Palestine posters from myriad sources making it what many library science specialists say is the largest such archives in the world.

To fortify our home - use Hebrew cement, 1937.



Come and See the Palestine Exhibition - Vienna, 1925.

Text in logo in upper left hand corner - The Worker, 1937.

Build Industries In Palestine!, 1927

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