Missing Lichtenstein painting found 42 years later

The famed pop artist's "Electric Cord" recently resurfaced in a New York storage facility

Topics: Hyperallergic, South America, Roy Lichtenstein, Electric Cord, Paiting, Colombia, Bogotá,

Missing Lichtenstein painting found 42 years later
This article originally appeared on Hyperallergic.

Hyperallergic Famed Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein’s “Electric Cord” may have been painted in 1961 but no one who wasn’t alive in the 1960s has ever seen it. Why? Because in January 1970, when art dealer Leo Castelli sent it to art restorer Daniel Goldreyer for cleaning, it mysteriously disappeared.

“Electric Cord”

Fast forward to December 2006, when the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to the artist’s legacy, published an image of the black and white work on the front of its holiday card and appealed to its community for help locate the work. It kind of worked.

This past summer, the painting resurfaced at the Hayes Storage Facility in New York, where it was being stored by the Quinta Gallery art gallery of Bogotá, Colombia, as a consignment from Goldreyer’s widow, Sally Goldreyer. Oops!

The story doesn’t end there. Goldreyer says she’s not to blame. This from the FBI:



According to Sally Goldreyer, when her husband died in 2009, she and others began to clean out the lockers of his company’s employees, including an employee named Ben Dolinsky (Dolinksy). She contends that the contents of Dolinksy’s locker were boxed and given away to a “friend,” who, three years later, asked her to sell the “Electric Cord” for him. She claims that she then offered to sell the “Electric Cord” to the Quinta Galeria art gallery but refunded the gallery’s deposit when she found a missing notice for the painting posted on the Internet.

But don’t worry, there’s a happy ending … “Electric Cord” was returned earlier today to Barbara Bertozzi Castelli, the art dealer’s widow.

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 13
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Api Étoile

    Like little stars.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Calville Blanc

    World's best pie apple. Essential for Tarte Tatin. Has five prominent ribs.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Chenango Strawberry

    So pretty. So early. So ephemeral. Tastes like strawberry candy (slightly).

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Chestnut Crab

    My personal fave. Ultra-crisp. Graham cracker flavor. Should be famous. Isn't.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    D'Arcy Spice

    High flavored with notes of blood orange and allspice. Very rare.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Esopus Spitzenberg

    Jefferson's favorite. The best all-purpose American apple.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Granite Beauty

    New Hampshire's native son has a grizzled appearance and a strangely addictive curry flavor. Very, very rare.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Hewes Crab

    Makes the best hard cider in America. Soon to be famous.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Hidden Rose

    Freak seedling found in an Oregon field in the '60s has pink flesh and a fragrant strawberry snap. Makes a killer rose cider.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Knobbed Russet

    Freak city.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Newtown Pippin

    Ben Franklin's favorite. Queen Victoria's favorite. Only apple native to NYC.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Pitmaston Pineapple

    Really does taste like pineapple.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>