The Egyptian revolution: two years later

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    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Carlos Latuff

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    Khaled Saeed's brutal attack and murder in the hands of Alexandria police in June 2010 sparked protests in Alexandria and Cairo months before January 25, 2011. Photos of his badly beaten body went viral, and rallied many Egyptians against the country's chronic police brutality. His supporters created a Facebook page to commemorate his life and death, "We Are All Khaled Saeed." Moderated by Google executive Wael Ghonim, the website is credited as being the first platform to call for protests in Tahrir Square on January 25th.

    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Kodak Agfa

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    A young man holds up the Egyptian flag over a lion statue on Cairo's Qasr al-Nil Bridge during the January and February 2011 protests. The bridge, which serves as a route to Tahrir Square, saw many protestors throughout the revolution.

    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Jonathan Rashad

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    Amid rumors that Hosni Mubarak would soon announce his resignation, protestors swelled Tahrir Square on February 10, 2011. When the President declared that he would remain in power until September, allegedly to ensure a peaceful transition, demonstrators reacted with fury. Waving their shoes in the air and demanding the army join their ranks, the protestors continued their demonstration unabated. A day later, on February 11, tens of thousands of Egyptians celebrated Mubarak's resignation and the end of his 30-year rule. According to an Amnesty International report from May 2011, over 840 people were killed and more than 6,000 injured during the revolution.

    Photo Credit: AP

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    As he sat on a gurney in a metal cage, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was convicted for failing to stop the killings of protestors on June 2, 2012. The verdict was greeted with anger and fury when it failed to address the corruption charges laid against the former president and his notorious sons, as well as its failure to hold anyone directly responsible for the deaths of demonstrators.

    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Lilian Wagdy

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    A Muslim girl cries with her Christian friend, who lost her brother during October 2011's Maspero clashes. The clashes began as a largely Coptic demonstration against the Supreme Council of Armed Forces' (or SCAF) inability to protect Egypt's minority Coptic community from violent attacks. SCAF, which had been governing the country since Mubarak's ouster, also failed to investigate such attacks, including the burning of a Coptic church that premeditated the Maspero protests. The demonstrations turned violent, with over two dozen protesters killed.

    Photo Credit: AP

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    An Egyptian paints an election banner ahead of parliamentary elections on November 13, 2011 in Cairo. The first phase of the elections, which was held on November 28, saw the country's first democratic election of any kind. At the time, many protesters took to the streets in a series of demonstrations that sometimes ended in violent clashes. One protest, a sit-in near the Cabinet Office, was in opposition to SCAF's appointment of a Mubarak-era official as the new Prime Minister. Although the demonstration began as a peaceful protest, the "Cabinet Clashes" quickly turned violent, including the now infamous image of the "blue bra girl" being dragged and beaten by police.

    Photo Credit: AP

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    An Egyptian woman searches for the nearest voting station in a Cairo suburb on May 23, 2012. In the 16 months following the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt was ruled by the Supreme Council of Armed Services. For two days, Egyptians went to the polls to determine their first democratically elected president.

    Photo Credit: AP

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood candidate for president, Mohamed Morsi, held a rally in Cairo on May 20, 2012. A month later, on June 24, he narrowly won the election with 51% of the vote. Although the trajectory of his presidency remains hazy, he has managed to challenge the Egyptian military's sweeping power in the wake of the revolution, broker a peace deal between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip, and inspire fiery protests against him in Tahrir Square.

    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Gigi Ibrahim

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    On November 27, 2012, more than 100,000 Egyptian protesters gathered in Tahrir Square to protest against President Morsi's November 22 decree that granted him sweeping constitutional powers. The decree, which protected him from any judicial oversight, harkened back to Mubarak-era policies of absolute presidential powers. Police forces clashed with protesters, firing tear gas into crowds in scenes reminiscent of the 2011 demonstrations.

    Photo Credit: AP

    The Egyptian revolution: two years later

    A protester prepares to throw a Molotov cocktail outside of Tahrir Square on January 24, 2013. On the eve of the second anniversary of the revolution, Egyptians gathered in large numbers to protest against Egypt's new constitution. The constitution was adopted after a two-day referendum, in which 64% of voters voted yes. Only 33% of the population took part in the referendum, showcasing the country's divided attitude towards the vote. Protesters oppose the Islamist constitutional assembly that drafted the document, as well as the sweeping powers they feel President Morsi is granted by it.

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