The Week in Pictures

From an explosion in Mexico to riots in Egypt, a look at what dominated the headlines this week SLIDE SHOW

Topics: slideshow, The Week in Pictures,

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 21
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

    The Week in Pictures

    Ben Affleck

    Ben Affleck poses backstage with the award for best cast in a motion picture for "Argo" at the 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

    (AP/Virginie Nguyen Hoang)

    The Week in Pictures

    Egypt

    Sunday, a protester prepares to throw a rock while surrounded by tear gas and smoke during clashes with security forces near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. Police have fired tear gas at rock-throwing protesters in Cairo marking the fifth consecutive day of street violence in Egypt and clashes continue a day after Egypt's president declared a state of emergency in three provinces hit hardest by political violence.

    (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    The Week in Pictures

    Trevi fountain

    Tourists gather at Trevi Fountain, in Rome, Monday. The Fendi fashion house is financing a 2.12 million euro ($2.8 million) restoration of Trevi Fountain, famed as a setting for the film "La Dolce Vita'' and the place where dreamers leave their coins. The 20-month project on one of the city's most iconic fountains was being unveiled at a city hall press conference Monday.

    (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Home Video)

    The Week in Pictures

    Cabaret anniversary

    This 1972 photo released by Warner Bros. Home Video shows Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles, left, and Joel Grey as Master of Ceremonies in a scene from "Cabaret." The landmark film, starring Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey and Michael York, has turned 41. All three actors will be attending an anniversary celebration screening Thursday, at the Ziegfeld Theatre, where the movie first premiered in 1972.

    (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

    The Week in Pictures

    Dieter Kosslick

    Dieter Kosslick, director of the International Film Festival Berlin, Berlinale, poses for media prior to the annual program press conference in Berlin, Monday. The Berlinale will take place at the German capital from Feb. 7-17, 2013.

    (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    The Week in Pictures

    Karl Lagerfeld

    Designer Karl Lagerfeld poses for photographers prior to the start of a press conference, in Rome, Monday.

    (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

    The Week in Pictures

    Belgium steelworkers

    Steelworkers from ArcelorMittal in Liege, Belgium, run for cover as police use a water cannon during a protest near the Walloon Minister President's office in Namur, Belgium, Tuesday. The world's leading steel and mining company ArcelorMittal announced Thursday it will close a coke plant and six production lines in Belgium, in a move that threatens 1,300 jobs.

    (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    The Week in Pictures

    Chris Culliver

    San Francisco 49ers cornerback Chris Culliver talks with teammates during a media availability Wednesday, in New Orleans. The 49ers said Wednesday they have addressed anti-gay remarks made by Culliver during a Super Bowl media day interview Tuesday. The 49ers are scheduled to play the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game on Feb. 3.

    (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    The Week in Pictures

    Alicia Keys

    Singer Alicia Keys, the global creative director of BlackBerry, appears Wednesday, in New York. The maker of the BlackBerry smartphone is promising a speedy browser, a superb typing experience and the ability to keep work and personal identities separate on the same phone, the fruit of a crucial, long-overdue makeover for the Canadian company.

    (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

    The Week in Pictures

    Pakistan polio

    A Pakistani man holds his son as a health worker prepares to give the child a polio vaccine, in a neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan, Jan. 30, 2013. Some Islamic militants oppose the vaccination campaign, accuse health workers of acting as spies for the U.S. and claim the polio vaccine is intended to make Muslim children sterile. Pakistan is one of the few remaining places where polio is still rampant.

    (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)

    The Week in Pictures

    Bangladeshi clash

    Bangladeshi government supporters kick a Jamaat-e-Islami activist on a street during a march by the Islamist party to garner support for Thursday'€™s nationwide strike, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Wednesday. Bangladesh's main Islamist party has been demanding a halt to the trials of its top leaders facing charges of crimes against humanity involving the nation's 1971 independence war against Pakistan.

    (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

    The Week in Pictures

    France gay marriage

    Opponents to gay marriage pray during a demonstration in Paris, Tuesday. The French government has presented a plan for debate in Parliament to legalize gay marriage and adoption.

    (AP Photo/Harouna Traore)

    The Week in Pictures

    Mali

    People in colorful dress walk near the Sankore Mosque, a United Nations world heritage cultural site, which would not be allowed under the rule of Islamic militants who ruled the city until French troops took control, in Timbuktu, Mali, Thursday. Many things have changed in Timbuktu since French troops parachuted in several days ago to take control of the area from Islamic militants, and now there is a growing sense of freedom.

    (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

    The Week in Pictures

    PEMEX

    A worker belonging to Mexico's state-owned oil company PEMEX keeps journalists away after an explosion at an adjacent building to the executive tower of PEMEX in Mexico City, Thursday. An explosion at the main headquarters of Mexico's state-owned oil company in the capital Thursday left at least several workers injured, blew out windows and damaged the building, the company said.

    (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Curtis Compton)

    The Week in Pictures

    Shooting Atlanta

    Mother and daughter embrace as Tiffany Myricle, 37, leads her daughter Xavia Denise Myricle away from her school bus when parents and children are reunited at Emmanuel Baptist Church after a shooting at an Price middle school in Atlanta on Thursday. A 14-year-old boy was wounded outside the school Thursday afternoon and a fellow student was in custody as a suspect, authorities said. No other students were hurt.

    (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

    The Week in Pictures

    Beyoncé

    Beyoncé answers questions during an NFL football Super Bowl XLVII news conference at the New Orleans Convention Center, Jan. 31, 2013. in New Orleans.

    (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    The Week in Pictures

    Cambodia

    Mourners gather in front of the Royal Palace and light incense sticks as offerings to the late Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk ahead of Sihanouk's funeral, Thursday, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The body of Sihanouk, who died on Oct. 15, 2012, at age 89, is scheduled to be cremated on Feb. 4, 2013.

    (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    The Week in Pictures

    David Beckham

    Sports Director Leonardo, left, British soccer player David Beckham, center, and Paris Saint Germain's President Nasser Al-Khelaifi, right, pose with Beckham's jersey during a press conference, at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris, Thursday. David Beckham will join Paris Saint-Germain on Thursday, opting for a move to France after mulling over lucrative offers from around the world since leaving the Los Angeles Galaxy.

    (AP Photo/Abylay Saralayev)

    The Week in Pictures

    Kyrgyzstan

    Kyrgyz orphans look on in an orphanage in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Thursday. Americans were in the process of adopting 65 orphans from Kyrgyzstan when it suspended international adoptions in 2008 due to allegations of fraud. Some of the Americans gave up, some of the children were placed in domestic adoptions, and last summer nine of the remaining children finally were allowed to go to America. There are now 16 U.S. families still waiting, five year later.

    (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

    The Week in Pictures

    Puerto Rico pensions

    People protest outside the government pension headquarters in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday. Puerto Rico is confronting what economists and financial analysts say is a ticking fiscal time bomb: a public pension system with a $37.3 billion unfunded liability that must be addressed soon.

  • Recent Slide Shows

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 7
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    AP/Jae C. Hong

    Your summer in extreme weather

    California drought

    Since May, California has faced a historic drought, resulting in the loss of 63 trillion gallons of water. 95.4 percent of the state is now experiencing "severe" drought conditions, which is only a marginal improvement from 97.5 percent last week.

    A recent study published in the journal Science found that the Earth has actually risen about 0.16 inches in the past 18 months because of the extreme loss of groundwater. The drought is particularly devastating for California's enormous agriculture industry and will cost the state $2.2 billion this year, cutting over 17,000 jobs in the process.

       

    Meteorologists blame the drought on a large zone (almost 4 miles high and 2,000 miles long) of high pressure in the atmosphere off the West Coast which blocks Pacific winter storms from reaching land. High pressure zones come and go, but this one has been stationary since December 2012.

    Darin Epperly

    Your summer in extreme weather

    Great Plains tornadoes

    From June 16-18 this year, the Midwest was slammed by a series of four tornadoes, all ranking as category EF4--meaning the winds reached up to 200 miles per hour. An unlucky town called Pilger in Nebraska was hit especially hard, suffering through twin tornadoes, an extreme event that may only occur every few decades. The two that swept through the town killed two people, injured 16 and demolished as many as 50 homes.   

    "It was terribly wide," local resident Marianne Pesotta said to CNN affiliate KETV-TV. "I drove east [to escape]. I could see how bad it was. I had to get out of there."   

    But atmospheric scientist Jeff Weber cautions against connecting these events with climate change. "This is not a climate signal," he said in an interview with NBC News. "This is a meteorological signal."

    AP/Detroit News, David Coates

    Your summer in extreme weather

    Michigan flooding

    On Aug. 11, Detroit's wettest day in 89 years -- with rainfall at 4.57 inches -- resulted in the flooding of at least five major freeways, leading to three deaths, more than 1,000 cars being abandoned on the road and thousands of ruined basements. Gov. Rick Snyder declared it a disaster. It took officials two full days to clear the roads. Weeks later, FEMA is finally set to begin assessing damage.   

    Heavy rainfall events are becoming more and more common, and some scientists have attributed the trend to climate change, since the atmosphere can hold more moisture at higher temperatures. Mashable's Andrew Freedman wrote on the increasing incidence of this type of weather: "This means that storms, from localized thunderstorms to massive hurricanes, have more energy to work with, and are able to wring out greater amounts of rain or snow in heavy bursts. In general, more precipitation is now coming in shorter, heavier bursts compared to a few decades ago, and this is putting strain on urban infrastructure such as sewer systems that are unable to handle such sudden influxes of water."

    AP/The Fresno Bee, Eric Paul Zamora

    Your summer in extreme weather

    Yosemite wildfires

    An extreme wildfire burning near Yosemite National Park forced authorities to evacuate 13,000 nearby residents, while the Madera County sheriff declared a local emergency. The summer has been marked by several wildfires due to California's extreme drought, which causes vegetation to become perfect kindling.   

    Surprisingly, however, firefighters have done an admirable job containing the blazes. According to the L.A. Times, firefighters with the state's Department of Forestry and Fire Protection have fought over 4,000 fires so far in 2014 -- an increase of over 500 fires from the same time in 2013.

    Reuters/Eugene Tanner

    Your summer in extreme weather

    Hawaii hurricanes

    Hurricane Iselle was set to be the first hurricane to make landfall in Hawaii in 22 years. It was downgraded to a tropical storm and didn't end up being nearly as disastrous as it could have been, but it still managed to essentially shut down the entire state for a day, as businesses and residents hunkered down in preparation, with many boarding up their windows to guard against strong gusts. The storm resulted in downed trees, 21,000 people out of power and a number of damaged homes.

    Debbie Arita, a local from the Big Island described her experience: "We could hear the wind howling through the doors. The light poles in the parking lot were bobbing up and down with all the wind and rain."

    Reuters/NASA

    Your summer in extreme weather

    Florida red tide

    A major red tide bloom can reach more than 100 miles along the coast and around 30 miles offshore. Although you can't really see it in the above photo, the effects are devastating for wildlife. This summer, Florida was hit by an enormous, lingering red tide, also known as a harmful algae bloom (HAB), which occurs when algae grow out of control. HABs are toxic to fish, crabs, octopuses and other sea creatures, and this one resulted in the death of thousands of fish. When the HAB gets close enough to shore, it can also have an effect on air quality, making it harder for people to breathe.   

    The HAB is currently closest to land near Pinellas County in the Gulf of Mexico, where it is 5-10 miles offshore.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>