Lily Tomlin’s very long engagement

The actress and comic says she and her partner might get married after 42 years together

Topics: LGBT, Lily tomlin, DoMA, Marriage equality, Gay Marriage, Jane Wagner,

Lily Tomlin's very long engagementLily Tomlin (Credit: AP/Matt Sayles)

We still have so, so far to go in this country toward LGBT tolerance and equality. But it’s incredible to consider how far we’ve come. Not just in the past few months. In the span of just one person’s lifetime, she has gone from coyly deflecting questions about why she isn’t married to talking hopefully about tying the knot – with the woman she’s been with for over four decades.

Fans who recall her earlier career know that actress and comic pioneer Lily Tomlin spent much of it circumspect about her sexuality. Sure, she openly acknowledged her collaborator Jane Wagner; she narrated the documentary “The Celluloid Closet” in 1995. But last year, Michael Musto said that Armistead Maupin, who wrote the narration for the film, had been displeased with “the absurdity of having a closeted person like her narrate” it. Tomlin didn’t officially come out until a 2000 interview with New York City cable-access TV program Gay USA. Back then, she explained, “I’m not going to make a big national case of it which is what, really, everybody would like to do, or some people. But in most articles, most people refer to Jane as my partner or my life-partner or whatever … We’ve been around so long and been through so much and I always kind of took a lot of stuff for granted. I also never wanted to be anybody’s spokesperson or poster person. You know, I see what happens to too many people.” A year earlier, she told Denver’s Out Front, “I never officially came out in any kind of really public way. I just always lived very simply and openly, but the press has never made a big fuss about me or said anything to me.”



In the intervening years, however, more details of her life have emerged, including some strong suggestions that there have been a few fusses and things had been said along the way after all – and that her privacy was a more conscious choice. Last year, Tomlin told Rosie O’Donnell that back when she and Wagner were doing TV specials, “One of our writers said to me, ‘I think you and Jane should come to work in separate cars.’” Tomlin has also revealed that in 1975, more than two decades before Ellen DeGeneres would announce “Yup, I’m gay” on its cover, Time magazine asked her to be the first to come out on its front page. “I was more insulted than anything,” she has said. “I felt it was a bribe: ‘We need a gay person, and we’ll take anybody!’” She’s admitted, however, “In some ways, I regret that I didn’t do it, that I didn’t take that opportunity. But at that time, my inflated idea about myself as an artist superseded everything.” She’s further acknowledged that her admitting her sexuality was “hard” on her mother – who also had a gay son – because “She was concerned the rest of the family would somehow be critical or I’d somehow suffer in some way.” And this past spring, she contrasted the present climate with that of her earlier career, recalling, “It is remarkably wonderful [that celebrities can be openly gay], because I was on Carson one night back in ’73. Carson said to me, knowing full well what he was saying, he said, ‘Well, now you’ve never been married, have you?’ I said, ‘No.’ And he said, ‘Don’t you want to have children?’ And you could hear the audience got dead [silent], because in those days if a girl said she didn’t want to have children or plan to get married it was … something’s wrong with you.”

But on Monday evening, a mere 40 years after sitting down with Carson, she was eager to talk about her relationship and her plans. At an Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Pre-Emmy Performers Peer Group reception, Tomlin, who turns 74 in September, noted proudly that she and her 78-year-old partner, Wagner, have been together for 42 years. Then later, she revealed to E! that “We’re thinking maybe we’ll get married.” Calling the recent strides toward marriage equality “pretty remarkable,” she added, “You don’t really need to get married, but marriage is awfully nice. Everybody I know who got married, they say it really makes a difference. They feel very, very happy about it.”

For Tomlin, who’s lived her whole public life determined to not be coerced into anything, being able to freely choose to marry or not to marry is awfully nice indeed. It’s an evolution of an individual’s life and the world in which she lives, a possibility that was all but unimaginable not so very long ago. And if Tomlin does walk down aisle, she’s determined to do it as she’s done everything else in her career – on her terms. “No rings, no bridal dresses,” she told E!. “Maybe we’ll be dressed like chickens.”

Mary Elizabeth Williams

Mary Elizabeth Williams is a staff writer for Salon and the author of "Gimme Shelter: My Three Years Searching for the American Dream." Follow her on Twitter: @embeedub.

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 13
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Api Étoile

    Like little stars.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Calville Blanc

    World's best pie apple. Essential for Tarte Tatin. Has five prominent ribs.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Chenango Strawberry

    So pretty. So early. So ephemeral. Tastes like strawberry candy (slightly).

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Chestnut Crab

    My personal fave. Ultra-crisp. Graham cracker flavor. Should be famous. Isn't.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    D'Arcy Spice

    High flavored with notes of blood orange and allspice. Very rare.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Esopus Spitzenberg

    Jefferson's favorite. The best all-purpose American apple.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Granite Beauty

    New Hampshire's native son has a grizzled appearance and a strangely addictive curry flavor. Very, very rare.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Hewes Crab

    Makes the best hard cider in America. Soon to be famous.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Hidden Rose

    Freak seedling found in an Oregon field in the '60s has pink flesh and a fragrant strawberry snap. Makes a killer rose cider.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Knobbed Russet

    Freak city.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Newtown Pippin

    Ben Franklin's favorite. Queen Victoria's favorite. Only apple native to NYC.

    Clare Barboza/Bloomsbury

    Uncommon Apples

    Pitmaston Pineapple

    Really does taste like pineapple.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

Loading Comments...