Landfill gas helps Palo Alto go carbon neutral

A key advantage of landfill-to-gas energy is its dependability

Topics: renewable energy, Palo Alto, California, Energy, Solar Power, Wind power, , ,

It’s not all about solar for Palo Alto, Calif.

Sure, the Silicon Valley city offers generous installation rebates, has a feed-in tariff program and has contracted for some of the cheapest utility-scale solar known to man, at 6.9 cents per kilowatt-hour. But Palo Alto is also big on landfill gas-to-energy, and a new project 90 miles down U.S. Highway 101 in Gonzales, Calif., is expected to provide the city around 10.4 gigawatt-hours of electricity every year.


image via City of Palo Alto

image via City of Palo Alto

The project takes advantage of gas bubbling up from the Salinas Valley Solid Waste Authority’s Johnson Canyon Landfill. These gases, produced by the decomposition of trash, previously had been flared off to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That was better than nothing, since it converted the methane to carbon dioxide, a less potent greenhouse gas, but it introduced other potential environmental hazards while also failing to take advantage of the opportunity to make use of the energy in the gas.

The new plant was built by Ameresco, which is becoming a frequent partner of Palo Alto’s. The city is already buying 11.2 GWh/year of energy from the Santa Cruz landfill gas project, 40.7 from Half Moon Bay and 11.8 from Keller Canyon. An additional 51.9 GWh/year is expected from two more projects on the way.

All of this is pointed toward making the city 100 percent carbon neutral. Technically, it can already claim that status, through the use of short-term renewable resources and renewable energy certificates to go along with  committed long-term renewable and hydroelectric resources.



But looking beyond 2016, it wants more longer-term renewable resources, and it expects to get them without spending a lot of money: “The Carbon Neutral Plan achieves carbon neutrality for the electric supply portfolio at a cost expected to be less than one tenth of a cent per kilowatt hour [kWh}  above the already anticipated cost of ~four tenths of a cent per kWh to meet the City’s renewable energy portfolio standard goal,” the city has said.

According to city documents, the landfill-to-gas projects are among the priciest renewable energy sources the city is buying, nearly double what it's paying for its cheapest wind and solar power [PDF]. But landfill-to-gas is a renewable energy resource that has a key advantage that enhances its value: It produces steadily, 24 hours a day, 356 days a year, rain or shine.

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 11
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    Burger King Japan

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Burger King's black cheeseburger: Made with squid ink and bamboo charcoal, arguably a symbol of meat's destructive effect on the planet. Only available in Japan.

    Elite Daily/Twitter

    2014's fast food atrocities

    McDonald's Black Burger: Because the laws of competition say that once Burger King introduces a black cheeseburger, it's only a matter of time before McDonald's follows suit. You still don't have to eat it.

    Domino's

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Domino's Specialty Chicken: It's like regular pizza, except instead of a crust, there's fried chicken. The company's marketing officer calls it "one of the most creative, innovative menu items we have ever had” -- brain power put to good use.

    Arby's/Facebook

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Arby's Meat Mountain: The viral off-menu product containing eight different types of meat that, on second read, was probably engineered by Arby's all along. Horrific, regardless.

    KFC

    2014's fast food atrocities

    KFC'S ZINGER DOUBLE DOWN KING: A sandwich made by adding a burger patty to the infamous chicken-instead-of-buns creation can only be described using all caps. NO BUN ALL MEAT. Only available in South Korea.

    Taco Bell

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Taco Bell's Waffle Taco: It took two years for Taco Bell to develop this waffle folded in the shape of a taco, the stand-out star of its new breakfast menu.

    Michele Parente/Twitter

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Krispy Kreme Triple Cheeseburger: Only attendees at the San Diego County Fair were given the opportunity to taste the official version of this donut-hamburger-heart attack combo. The rest of America has reasonable odds of not dropping dead tomorrow.

    Taco Bell

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Taco Bell's Quesarito: A burrito wrapped in a quesadilla inside an enigma. Quarantined to one store in Oklahoma City.

    Pizzagamechangers.com

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Boston Pizza's Pizza Cake: The people's choice winner of a Canadian pizza chain's contest whose real aim, we'd imagine, is to prove that there's no such thing as "too far." Currently in development.

    7-Eleven

    2014's fast food atrocities

    7-Eleven's Doritos Loaded: "For something decadent and artificial by design," wrote one impassioned reviewer, "it only tasted of the latter."

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

Loading Comments...