Are these washable, hand-crocheted tampons for real?

Sets of three retail for $15 on Etsy

Topics: green consumerism, Etsy, menstruation, tampons,

Are these washable, hand-crocheted tampons for real? (Credit: Etsy)

Spotted on Etsy: the handmade washable tampon. Crafter Robin explains why these knitted wonders are the thing your menstrual cycle’s been missing:

They are hand crocheted by me using 100% cotton thread in ercu and they are filled with a circle of natural bamboo(90%)cotton(10%) interlock fabric that is serged on the raw edge. The bamboo fabric is higly [sic] absorbent, much more so than cotton. This construction allows for ease of separating the lining and the tampon shell for washing, boiling (if desired) and for air drying. The pull string is braided and is part of the construction so it cannot slip. Instructions for washing will be included. What a great way to start your efforts to “go green”.

Every reporter has her limits, and I will not be trying out and reviewing this particular offering for my series on green products. In lieu of that, here’s what one satisfied customer had to say about them:



“I don’t normally buy non applicator tampons. I hardly noticed it was there. I didn’t have a problem with leakage. It was easy to take out and very easy to wash. I thought it would take me a while to wash off. But I soaked it, as per your instructions and machine washed and they were very easy to clean off and use again. I am one satisfied customer! Not only am I convert to this alternative method, but I feel good knowing that I’m doing good for my body and the environment. I am planning to buy more for next month! I would be more than happy to testify on your product. It’s unique and very much a needed item.”

h/t Grist

Lindsay Abrams

Lindsay Abrams is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on all things sustainable. Follow her on Twitter @readingirl, email labrams@salon.com.

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