Bill Nye: Future of U.S. economy at stake in Texas Board of Education evolution debate

The Science Guy weighs in on how teaching kids about evolution will impact the U.S. economy well into the future

Topics: Bill Nye, bill nye the science guy, Texas, Evolution, Science, Board of Education, The Huffington Post, ,

Members of the Texas Board of Education who don’t want evolution taught in the state’s schools have to contend with there being a legend on the other side of the issue — none other than Bill Nye, “the Science Guy.”

Asked by the Huffington Post what he thought of the recent debate in Texas over whether to teach evolution — a debate the pro-evolution contingent ultimately won — Nye was blunt and unsparing in his criticism. “This textbook business is, to my way of thinking, a very serious matter, because of the economic impact,” Nye responded via email.



“Everyone should take a moment and think what it will mean to raise a generation of students who might believe that it is reasonable to think for a moment that the Earth might be 10,000 years old.” Nye went on the call the anti-evolution take on the age of the Earth “an outrageous notion.”

“It’s not a benign idea. It’s inane or silly. These students will not accept the process of science, which will stifle or suppress innovation,” Nye said.

Nye went on to argue that suppressing science would lead to a generation of students ill-equipped to compete in the global economy.

“It’s not a religious issue, as such,” said Nye. “It’s the future of the United States’ economy that’s at stake.”

Elias Isquith

Elias Isquith is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on politics. Follow him on Twitter at @eliasisquith, and email him at eisquith@salon.com.

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