Morrissey: Eating meat is the moral equivalent of pedophilia or Nazism

The British musician opens up for the umpteenth time about his hatred of Jamie Oliver

Topics: Morrissey, meat, Nazism, godwin's law,

Morrissey: Eating meat is the moral equivalent of pedophilia or NazismMorrissey (Credit: AP/Owen Sweeney)

He already told us “Meat is Murder”‘ — so this should, perhaps, come as no surprise.

Promoting his memoir, “Autobiography,” Morrissey told fans in an online Q&A session that:

“If you have access to You Tube, you should click on to what is called The video the meat industry doesn’t want you to see. [sic] If this doesn’t affect you in a moral sense then you’re probably granite. I see no difference between eating animals and paedophilia. They are both rape, violence, murder. If I’m introduced to anyone who eats beings, I walk away. Imagine, for example, if you were in a nightclub and someone said to you ‘Hello, I enjoy bloodshed, throat-slitting and the destruction of life,’ well, I doubt if you’d want to exchange phone numbers.”

Morrissey, a lifelong animal-rights advocate who canceled a 2009 Coachella concert over the smell of a barbecue, criticizes celebrities in particular for their promotion of meat.

“If Jamie ‘Orrible is so certain that flesh-food is tasty then why doesn’t he stick one of his children in a microwave? It would taste the same as cooked lamb. The singer Cilla Black recently appeared on television telling us how she was preparing leg of lamb for dinner, and since a lamb is a baby, I wondered what kind of mind Cilla Black could possibly have that would convince her that eating a baby is OK.”



The singer’s objections go yet further when he violates the so-called Godwin’s Law, the notion that comparing anything to the Third Reich is an automatic conversation-ender: “If you believe in the abattoir then you would support Auschwitz,” he writes. But it’s not just animal advocacy for Moz: The singer is currently at work on a novel, he said, having grown increasingly dispirited at the state of the music industry. “The actuality is that radio stations will not play my music, and the majority of people have lost faith in the music industry.”

Daniel D'Addario is a staff reporter for Salon's entertainment section. Follow him on Twitter @DPD_

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