Laura Ingraham: Justice Sotomayor’s “allegiance” is to “her immigrant family background” and not the Constitution

The right-wing radio host uses the first Latina Supreme Court justice to question immigrants' patriotism VIDEO

Topics: Video, Laura Ingraham, Sonia Sotomayor, illegal aliens, Undocumented immigrants, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor, Justice Sotomayor, Dinesh Dsouza, Puerto Rico, Media Matters, Immigration, ,

Laura Ingraham: Justice Sotomayor's "allegiance" is to "her immigrant family background" and not the ConstitutionLaura Ingraham

Laura Ingraham, last heard claiming that the English language is “in decline” due to Mexican “jingoism,” implied on her radio show on Tuesday that Justice Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina ever appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, cared more about her “immigrant family background” than the Constitution.

What so incensed Ingraham was Sotomayor’s remark on Monday, while speaking to a group of Yale Law students, that she was the first Supreme Court justice to use the term “undocumented immigrant” rather than “illegal alien.” Sotomayor explained her move by saying that calling undocumented immigrants “illegal aliens” struck her as “insulting.”

“Her duty is to defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and that’s what she says?” Ingraham railed. “Why do we have a Supreme Court justice whose allegiance obviously goes to her immigrant family background and not to the U.S. Constitution?” she continued. “So we have no rule of law. We are going to pick and choose who has to follow the law in the United States.”

“So why is Dinesh D’Souza, then, being targeted? Why is he being targeted? Why does that law apply?” Ingraham continued to rant.



Worth noting: As Media Matters’ Ellie Sandmeyer rightly points out, not only is Sotomayor, as a Puerto Rican American, a U.S. citizen, but her so-called immigrant parents are, too. In Ingraham’s defense, she could hardly be expected to know that; the law granting Puerto Ricans American citizenship was only passed in…1917.

You can listen to Ingraham’s attack below, via Media Matters:

Elias Isquith

Elias Isquith is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on politics. Follow him on Twitter at @eliasisquith, and email him at eisquith@salon.com.

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 11
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott and the friends with whom he recorded in middle school in Texas (photo courtesy of Dan Pickering)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Heatmiser publicity shot (L-R: Tony Lash, Brandt Peterson, Neil Gust, Elliott Smith) (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott and JJ Gonson (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    "Stray" 7-inch, Cavity Search Records (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott's Hampshire College ID photo, 1987

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott with "Le Domino," the guitar he used on "Roman Candle" (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Full "Roman Candle" record cover (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott goofing off in Portland (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Heatmiser (L-R: Elliott Smith, Neil Gust, Tony Lash, Brandt Peterson)(courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    The Greenhouse Sleeve -- Cassette sleeve from Murder of Crows release, 1988, with first appearance of Condor Avenue (photo courtesy of Glynnis Fawkes)

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

Loading Comments...