10 people the academy should have mentioned in its “In Memoriam” tribute

Missing from the tribute were Dennis Farina, James Avery and Corey Monteith, to name a few SLIDE SHOW

Topics: slideshow, in memoriam, Oscars 2014, Academy Awards, tributes, Awards,

Despite the endless montages that interrupted the 2014 Oscars, the awards show didn’t have time to celebrate all the influential figures who died in the past year, it seems. In its “In Memoriam” section, the Academy Awards paid tribute to several stars on Sunday night, including James Gandolfini, Roger Ebert, Harold Ramis, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Shirley Temple Black and Paul Walker, whose photos flashed on a screen before Bette Middler performed “The Wind Beneath My Wings.”

But the touching ceremony left out a number of other influential people, like James Avery, Dennis Farina and Corey Monteith. According to the Hollywood Reporter, “the names included in the segment are compiled by an “In Memoriam” committee that puts together a list of 25 to 30 people who will be highlighted during the ceremony.”

The focus is on “people who have made significant contributions to the industry and people from a variety of different sectors of the industry,” but the stars do not have to be academy members to be included.

While the academy remembered more than 100 members on its website, the on-air tribute left out some well-known figures who should not be forgotten — here are 10 of them.



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    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Dennis Farina

    Former Chicago cop-turned-actor Dennis Farina was best known for his role as Detective Joe Fontana in "Law & Order." Most recently, he starred in HBO series, "Luck." Farina died on July 22 from a pulmonary embolism. He was 69.

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Tom Clancy

    Bestselling novelist Tom Clancy was the inspiration for an entire genre of spy thriller films, including "The Hunt for Red October," "Patriot Games," and "Clear and Present Danger," which were all adapted from his novels of the same name. Clancy died at age 66 in October.

    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Jean Stapleton

    Jean Stapleton won three Emmy awards and 5 additional nominations for her portrayal of Edith Bunker in popular 1970s sitcom "All in the Family." She died at age 90 due to natural causes.

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Corey Monteith

    Known to "Glee" fans as Finn, the world lost Corey Monteith in July at the young age of 31. The actor, who had struggled with addiction for years, died from a toxic combination of heroin and alcohol in a Vancouver hotel room. He was reportedly engaged to "Glee" co-star and girlfriend Lea Michele at the time of his death.

    s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    James Avery

    James Avery touched an entire generation who grew up on "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air," in which Avery played the hard nosed Uncle Phil to Will Smith's character. Upon Avery's death in December, Smith , Smith mourned the actor's death, saying, "Every young man needs an Uncle Phil." Avery was 68.

    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Lee Thompson Young

    29-year-old actor Lee Thompson Young launched his television career in "The Famous Jett Jackson" as a teenager, and was most recently a co-star in the TNT series "Rizzoli & Isles." The actor reportedly suffered from bipolar and died tragically of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Marcia Wallace

    Voice actor and comedian Marcia Wallace had a career spanning six decades, and was best known as Carol Kester 70s sitcom "The Bob Newhart Show." Wallace was also the voice of Edna Krabappel on "The Simpsons." She died Oct. 26.

    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Nelson Mandela

    Although he was the subject of the critically acclaimed biopic "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom," the late South African President Nelson Mandela did not receive a special shout-out during the Oscars "In Memoriam" segment. U2 did, however, perform "Ordinary Love," the film's original song, which was nominated for an Oscar.

    AP

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Lou Reed

    Lou Reed was one of the most influential musicians of his generation, and Rolling Stone has dubbed his band Velvet Underground as one of the most influential rock bands of all time. Reed died from liver disease at age 71, and was survived by his wife, Laurie Anderson.

    AP/Hans Pennink

    10 people the Oscars should have remembered on air

    Pete Seeger

    Prolific songwriter and folk singer Pete Seeger an artist who could capture and define cultural era of his time. He blurred the boundary between music and activism, inspiring generations of Americans during the civil rights movement and beyond. Seeger died Jan. 27, 2014 at age 94.

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Prachi Gupta

Prachi Gupta is an Assistant News Editor for Salon, focusing on pop culture. Follow her on Twitter at @prachigu or email her at pgupta@salon.com.

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