Former GOP Rep. Joe Walsh kicked off radio for using racial slurs

The one-term Tea Party congressman apparently didn't know it's not OK to say the N-word while on the air

Topics: Joe Walsh, Redskins, Washington Redskins, Washington Football Team, Tea Party, Race, Racism, GOP, Republican Party, Tammy Duckworth, , ,

Former GOP Rep. Joe Walsh kicked off radio for using racial slurs (Credit: AP/Carolyn Kaster)

If you were hoping, after he was defeated by Tammy Duckworth in 2012, to never hear from former Tea Party congressman Joe Walsh again, we’ve got some bad news: He’s once again making national headlines for his behavior. But there’s some good news, too: This latest bout of poor judgment may well be enough to push Walsh off the public stage once and for all.

According to Walsh himself (via Twitter), the right-wing bomb-thrower was kicked off his own radio show on Thursday after saying a bunch of racial slurs on-air. Why would Walsh do something so obviously unacceptable? In defense of the (patently indefensible) Washington Redskins’ team name, of course!

Here’s how it went down, at least in Walsh’s telling:

Kicked off the air for saying the N-word? Imagine that!



For those grieving that this means the end of Joe Walsh’s public musings on the issues of the day — especially race relations — let the following reminders of previous Walsh gems be some solace. Like the time he said President Obama was only elected because he is black, for example; or the time Walsh claimed Democrats wanted to make Latino-Americans “dependent upon government,” just as they’ve done with blacks.

Elias Isquith

Elias Isquith is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on politics. Follow him on Twitter at @eliasisquith, and email him at eisquith@salon.com.

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