Seth Meyers mocks Apple and feds: "He never received it because the judge tried to find him on Apple Maps"

"The FBI is using a 1789 law to get into an iPhone," Meyers said. "1789: a time when people only used Blackberrys"


Brendan Gauthier
February 19, 2016 6:00PM (UTC)

In the latest edition of his always-on-point "Closer Look" segment, "Late Night" host Seth Meyers tackled Apple CEO Tim Cook's refusal to cooperate with the FBI in accessing encrypted info on one of the San Bernardino killers' iPhone.

Cook refused a judge's order to unlock the info, citing government overreach and prompting a heated debate over the issue of privacy.

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"That's right, Cook refused a judge's order," Meyers said. "Although, technically, he never received it because the judge tried to find him on Apple Maps."

The FBI is, more specifically, trying to bypass the security feature on the iPhone that permanently encrypts the phone's info if the incorrect password is entered more than ten times on the home screen.

"Apple has always been good with security," Meyers said. "They wouldn't even let Steve Jobs in the building unless he wore the same thing everyday."

Further controversy has surfaced in the privacy-vs.-security with respect to the FBI's use of the All Writs Act of 1789, which, according to the Washington Post, "has been used [since the colonial era] as a source of authority to issue orders that are not otherwise covered by a statute."

"The FBI is using a 1789 law to get into an iPhone," Meyers said. "1789: a time when people only used Blackberrys."

Do yourself a favor and don't sleep on Seth Meyers:

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Brendan Gauthier

Brendan Gauthier is a freelance writer.

MORE FROM Brendan GauthierFOLLOW @BuzzFeedBrandon

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Apple Fbi Late Night With Seth Meyers San Bernardino Seth Meyers Steve Jobs




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