10 from 2010: Our favorite Salon stories

One final look back at our own work, and what we liked best

Topics: Best of 2010, Inside Salon

10 from 2010: Our favorite Salon stories

Don’t worry — the tsunami of Best Of lists is almost over. I think we’re all looking forward to the fresh mystery of the new year. And right now, our necks ache from looking back so much; we’re particularly sick of the forced remembering of Christine O’Donnell and the Trololo guy. To the annals of footnoted history, we banish ye!

But we did want to highlight the pieces in Salon that — through an unscientific staff poll — we decided we liked the best this year. None of these should be a huge surprise to Salon readers; they were all big hits with you, too. From Glenn Greenwald’s incisive exploration of WikiLeaks, to Mary Elizabeth Williams’ gripping accounts of her cancer diagnosis and treatment, our favorite stories this year run a familiar Salon gamut of world-changing importance to the expressly, meaningfully personal.

And with no more fanfare than that, in chronological order, our 10 staff favorites:

  1. Hipsters on Food Stamps

    They’re young, they’re broke, and they pay for organic salmon with government subsidies. Got a problem with that?

    By Jennifer Bleyer

  2. The Tina Fey Backlash

    The “30 Rock” star’s pathetic single girl shtick is getting criticism from an unlikely source: Women who love her

    By Rebecca Traister

  3. The Civil Rights Heroism of Charles Sherrod

    Andrew Breitbart sure picked the wrong people to symbolize black “racism.” Taylor Branch and Clay Carson weigh in

    By Joan Walsh

  4. The Strange and Consequential Case of Bradley Manning, Adrian Lamo and WikiLeaks

    By Glenn Greenwald

  5. My Cancer Diagnosis

    Until last week, it was the best summer of my life. Then my doctor gave me the news I dreaded

    By Mary Elizabeth Williams

  6. How the “Ground Zero Mosque” Fear Mongering Began

    A viciously anti-Muslim blogger, the New York Post and the right-wing media machine: How it all went down

    By Justin Elliott

  7. My Relentless Pursuit of the Guy Who Robbed Me

    A thief broke into my car. I used Craigslist, a dating site, MySpace and a fast food joint to track him down

    By Amanda Enayati

  8. “Sopranos” Family Tree: Edith Bunker to Don Draper

    We chart the ancestors of the groundbreaking show — and how it continues to shape American TV

    By Matt Zoller Seitz

  9. Better Yet, DON’T Write That Novel

    Why National Novel Writing Month is a waste of time and energy

    By Laura Miller

  10. The War Room Hack Thirty

    By Alex Pareene

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And 10 more honorable mentions: David Rakoff’s wonderfully moving “Made” essay on his distinct craft; Andrew O’Hehir’s vivid takedowns of “Secretariat” and “Sex and the City 2″; mighty intern Emma Mustich’s gotcha on Sarah Palin’s desecration of the flag; our inside scoop on the biggest Oscar story of the year; Tracy Clark-Flory’s wonderful, moving piece about her mother and Christmas; Glenn Greenwald’s searing look at how Americans have been trained to think about Afghanistan; Francis Lam’s first time killing a chicken and his illuminating history lesson on General Tso’s chicken; and on Open Salon, Nelle Engoron’s intensely thought-out coverage of “Mad Men.”

Now, on to 2011!

Kerry Lauerman

Kerry Lauerman is Salon's Editor in Chief. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

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    Martyna Blaszczyk/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

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    Slide 1

    Pond de l'Archeveche - hundreds thousands of padlocks locked to a bridge by random couples, as a symbol of their eternal love. After another iconic Pont des Arts bridge was cleared of the padlocks in 2010 (as a safety measure), people started to place their love symbols on this one. Today both of the bridges are full of love locks again.

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    A bird's view of tulip fields near Voorhout in the Netherlands, photographed with a drone in April 2015.

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    Angalamman Festival is celebrated every year in a small town called Kaveripattinam in Tamil Nadu. Devotees, numbering in tens of thousands, converge in this town the day after Maha Shivratri to worship the deity Angalamman, meaning 'The Guardian God'. During the festival some of the worshippers paint their faces that personifies Goddess Kali. Other indulge in the ritual of piercing iron rods throughout their cheeks.

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    Kit Mikai is a natural rock formation about 40m high found in Western Kenya. She goes up the rocks regularly to meditate. Kit Mikai, Kenya

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    On a weekend trip to buffalo from Toronto we made a pit stop at Niagara Falls on the Canadian side. I took this shot with my nexus 5 smartphone. I was randomly shooting the falls themselves from different viewpoints when I happened to get a pretty lucky and interesting shot of this lone seagull on patrol over the falls. I didn't even realize I had captured it in the shot until I went back through the photos a few days later

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    Incredibly beautiful and extremely remote. Koehn Lake, Mojave Desert, California. Aerial Image.

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    Lucky timing! The oxpecker was originally sitting on hippo's head. I could see the hippo was going into a huge yawn (threat display?) and the oxpecker had to vacate it's perch. When I snapped the pic, the oxpecker appeared on the verge of being inhaled and was perfectly positioned between the massive gaping jaws of the hippo. The oxpecker also appears to be screeching in terror and back-pedaling to avoid being a snack!

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    The Yetis of Nepal - The Aghoris as they are called are marked by colorful body paint and clothes

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    This wave is situated right near the CBD of Sydney. Some describe it as the most dangerous wave in Australia, due to it breaking on barnacle covered rocks only a few feet deep and only ten metres from the cliff face. If you fall off you could find yourself in a life and death situation. This photo was taken 300 feet directly above the wave from a helicopter, just as the surfer is pulling into the lip of the barrel.

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