Introducing: Our first-ever Good Sex awards

From steamy hospital encounters to illicit trysts: Welcome to a celebration of the best literary sex writing,

Topics: Good Sex Awards, Books,

Introducing: Our first-ever Good Sex awards

Last fall, I wrote a column about the Bad Sex in Fiction Award presented annually by the Literary Review in Britain. “No one raises an eyebrow if you talk about what doesn’t strike you as erotic,” I kvetched, suggesting that praising good depictions of sex would require a lot more nerve. Writing well about sex — one of life’s most delightful and important activities — is difficult, so instead of sneering and sniggering at the authors who get it wrong, why not celebrate the ones who succeed?



Several of our readers asked that we step up and do just that, and so Salon’s first annual Good Sex Award was born. We canvassed a cross section of our literary friends, asking them to recommend favorite passages about sex in works of fiction published in 2010. After whittling those suggestions down to eight, we enlisted a panel of four judges — Maud Newton, Walter Kirn, Louis Bayard and myself — for the solemn task of selecting the winner.

Until Monday, we’ll be publishing two of those excerpts per day (on Sunday we will be publishing just the runner up), with the winner appearing on Valentine’s Day, along with comments from our judges. And yes, the scheduling is a little bit cheesy, but look at it this way: There isn’t a single dopey double-entendre in this entire introduction, which ought to make up for it.

Laura Miller

Laura Miller is a senior writer for Salon. She is the author of "The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures in Narnia" and has a Web site, magiciansbook.com.

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 11
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    Burger King Japan

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Burger King's black cheeseburger: Made with squid ink and bamboo charcoal, arguably a symbol of meat's destructive effect on the planet. Only available in Japan.

    Elite Daily/Twitter

    2014's fast food atrocities

    McDonald's Black Burger: Because the laws of competition say that once Burger King introduces a black cheeseburger, it's only a matter of time before McDonald's follows suit. You still don't have to eat it.

    Domino's

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Domino's Specialty Chicken: It's like regular pizza, except instead of a crust, there's fried chicken. The company's marketing officer calls it "one of the most creative, innovative menu items we have ever had” -- brain power put to good use.

    Arby's/Facebook

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Arby's Meat Mountain: The viral off-menu product containing eight different types of meat that, on second read, was probably engineered by Arby's all along. Horrific, regardless.

    KFC

    2014's fast food atrocities

    KFC'S ZINGER DOUBLE DOWN KING: A sandwich made by adding a burger patty to the infamous chicken-instead-of-buns creation can only be described using all caps. NO BUN ALL MEAT. Only available in South Korea.

    Taco Bell

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Taco Bell's Waffle Taco: It took two years for Taco Bell to develop this waffle folded in the shape of a taco, the stand-out star of its new breakfast menu.

    Michele Parente/Twitter

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Krispy Kreme Triple Cheeseburger: Only attendees at the San Diego County Fair were given the opportunity to taste the official version of this donut-hamburger-heart attack combo. The rest of America has reasonable odds of not dropping dead tomorrow.

    Taco Bell

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Taco Bell's Quesarito: A burrito wrapped in a quesadilla inside an enigma. Quarantined to one store in Oklahoma City.

    Pizzagamechangers.com

    2014's fast food atrocities

    Boston Pizza's Pizza Cake: The people's choice winner of a Canadian pizza chain's contest whose real aim, we'd imagine, is to prove that there's no such thing as "too far." Currently in development.

    7-Eleven

    2014's fast food atrocities

    7-Eleven's Doritos Loaded: "For something decadent and artificial by design," wrote one impassioned reviewer, "it only tasted of the latter."

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>