Georgia GOPers hold meeting over Obama mind-control conspiracy

In connection with an alleged UN plot to forcibly move everyone to the cities VIDEO

Topics: United Nations, Barack Obama, Georgia, Video, Republicans, Agenda 21, ,

Georgia GOPers hold meeting over Obama mind-control conspiracyPresident Barack Obama gestures as he answers a question during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Georgia state Senators held a meeting last month to discuss Agenda 21, a supposed UN conspiracy to deny private property rights, which Obama will help accomplish through a mind-control technique known as Delphi.

The meeting was to discuss Agenda 21, a nonbinding UN agreement aimed at promoting sustainable development. It is also the target of conservatives who believe that it is part of a conspiracy to forcibly move suburbanites to cities.

Jim Galloway of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports on the meeting, which was called by the Republican Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers, took place at the Capitol and was led by a former member of the Georgia Tea Party (who was forced out because of various conspiracy theories, including birtherism), Field Searcy. A 90-minute screening of the documentary Agenda: Grinding America Down was also shown, as was a video from conservative pundit Dick Morris, who warns of Obama’s “War on Suburbs” and plan to relocate everyone to urban areas.

In the video, Searcy calls Agenda 21 a “conspiracy to transform America from the land of the free, to the land of the collective,” and says that “our own governments are doing this. Our own local city councils and county commissions – they’re doing this.”

Searcy also says that Obama, local chambers of commerce and liberal groups will try to accomplish this through a form of mind-control:

They do that by a process known as the Delphi technique. The Delphi technique was developed by the Rand Corporation during the Cold War as a mind-control technique. It’s also known as “consensive process.” But basically the goal of the Delphi technique is to lead a targeted group of people to a pre-determined outcome while keeping the illusion of being open to public input.

The video was obtained by Bryan Long of the progressive group Better Georgia:

Tim Murphy of Mother Jones reports that fears of Agenda 21 have led to legislation in the states:



 In May, the Kansas Legislature approved a resolution blocking Agenda 21 from being implemented in its state, following in the footsteps of Tennessee. Rogers, the Georgia Senate majority leader, introduced legislation in January that would have blocked the nonbinding UN resolution from being applied to his state. Among other things, the resolution noted that, “according to the United Nations Agenda 21 policy, social justice is described as the right and opportunity of all people to benefit equally from the resources afforded by society and the environment which would be accomplished by socialists and communist redistribution of wealth.”

Jillian Rayfield is an Assistant News Editor for Salon, focusing on politics. Follow her on Twitter at @jillrayfield or email her at jrayfield@salon.com.

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