Alabama lawmaker: I take my abortion cues from God

No pretense about women's health or "science," state Sen. Shadrack McGill says God's word on abortion is enough

Topics: Abortion, Reproductive Rights, abortion rights, ,

Alabama lawmaker: I take my abortion cues from God

There has been a lot of pseudo-science and “women’s health” talk propping up many of the antiabortion measures making the legislative rounds, so it’s actually kind of nice when a lawmaker drops the pretense and gets real for a minute.

As Robyn Marty at RH Reality Check notes, Alabama state Sen. Shadrack McGill was unusually, almost refreshingly, candid about his reasons for pushing so many abortion restrictions through the Legislature: He’s pretty sure it’s what God wants him to do.

“Just based on the Scripture alone, the Psalm that talks about God knowing us before he placed us in our mother’s womb, is enough for me to know that that is a life inside of a mother,” McGill told the Daily Sentinel.

“So my question concerning aborted babies is, where do they go, heaven or hell? I just want to know what [people’s] perspective is.”

Alabama’s “personhood” bill, which tried to define “life” at the moment of conception, has so far failed to make it out of the Legislature, despite McGill’s support. He has said that he would still like to see a similar measure introduced in 2013.



But when it comes to banning abortion, McGill’s Republican colleagues aren’t quite as forthcoming about their motives. Alabama’s Republican House Caucus has set an agenda for the upcoming session that includes the Women’s Health and Safety Act, a bill that would, under the guise of — you guessed it — “women’s health and safety,” set up a maze of regulations to restrict access to abortion and effectively ban the procedure statewide.

Like a similar law in Mississippi, the Alabama bill would require direct physician involvement and set mandatory standards for nursing care and post-operative follow-up visits at abortion clinics, making it exceptionally difficult for abortion care providers to remain open.

Katie McDonough is an assistant editor for Salon, focusing on lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter @kmcdonovgh or email her at kmcdonough@salon.com.

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 10
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Bet Me" by Jennifer Crusie

    A contemporary romantic comedy set to Elvis Costello and lots of luxurious and sinful sugary treats.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Welcome to Temptation" by Jennifer Crusie

    Another of Crusie's romantic comedies, this one in the shadow of an ostentatiously phallic water tower.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "A Gentleman Undone" by Cecilia Grant

    A Regency romance with beautifully broken people and some seriously steamy sex.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Black Silk" by Judith Ivory

    A beautifully written, exquisitely slow-building Regency; the plot is centered on a box with some very curious images, as Edward Gorey might say.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "For My Lady's Heart" by Laura Kinsale

    A medieval romance, the period piece functions much like a dystopia, with the courageous lady and noble knight struggling to find happiness despite the authoritarian society.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Sweet Disorder" by Rose Lerner

    A Regency that uses the limitations on women of the time to good effect; the main character is poor and needs to sell her vote ... or rather her husband's vote. But to sell it, she needs to get a husband first ...   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Frenemy of the People" by Nora Olsen

    Clarissa is sitting at an awards banquet when she suddenly realizes she likes pictures of Kimye for both Kim and Kanye and she is totally bi. So she texts to all her friends, "I am totally bi!" Drama and romance ensue ... but not quite with who she expects. I got an advanced copy of this YA lesbian romance, and I’d urge folks to reserve a copy; it’s a delight.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "The Slightest Provocation" by Pam Rosenthal

    A separated couple works to reconcile against a background of political intrigue; sort of "His Gal Friday" as a spy novel set in the Regency.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Again" by Kathleen Gilles Seidel

    Set among workers on a period soap opera, it manages to be contemporary and historical both at the same time.   Read the whole essay.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>