Monopoly fans love cats, hate irons

The people have spoken: A feline game piece will replace the iron in new editions of Monopoly

Topics: monopoly, Cats, cat people, ,

Monopoly fans love cats, hate irons (Credit: AP)

Much as in real life, a cat’s killer instincts bested its foes: A robot, diamond ring, helicopter and guitar all lost out to their feline competition in a contest to be the next Monopoly game piece.

Fans from more than 120 countries voted on which of the eight tokens to add and which one to toss, with the cat coming out on top. Sadly, the iron came in last place and is now being retired. Goodbye, iron!

“Tokens are always a key part of the Monopoly game… and our fans are very passionate about their tokens, about which token they use while they play,” Jonathan Berkowitz, vice president for Hasbro gaming marketing, told the New York Daily News.

The cat will be joining the racecar, Scottie dog, a shoe, thimble, top hat, wheelbarrow and battleship as the newest game piece to pass “Go.”



The best part? Now players can kill downtime between turns (Monopoly is a slow game, am I right?) by doing cute stuff like putting the top hat on the cat or maybe pretending the cat and Scottie dog are chasing each other around the board! Or perhaps commander kitty could send the battleship to war against a rebel sect of those bouncy cat toys that look like fishing poles?

Really, this is great news all around. Congratulations, tiny cat! And to all real life cats: Today is your day. Hold your cat heads high!

 

Katie McDonough is an assistant editor for Salon, focusing on lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter @kmcdonovgh or email her at kmcdonough@salon.com.

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 10
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Bet Me" by Jennifer Crusie

    A contemporary romantic comedy set to Elvis Costello and lots of luxurious and sinful sugary treats.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Welcome to Temptation" by Jennifer Crusie

    Another of Crusie's romantic comedies, this one in the shadow of an ostentatiously phallic water tower.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "A Gentleman Undone" by Cecilia Grant

    A Regency romance with beautifully broken people and some seriously steamy sex.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Black Silk" by Judith Ivory

    A beautifully written, exquisitely slow-building Regency; the plot is centered on a box with some very curious images, as Edward Gorey might say.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "For My Lady's Heart" by Laura Kinsale

    A medieval romance, the period piece functions much like a dystopia, with the courageous lady and noble knight struggling to find happiness despite the authoritarian society.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Sweet Disorder" by Rose Lerner

    A Regency that uses the limitations on women of the time to good effect; the main character is poor and needs to sell her vote ... or rather her husband's vote. But to sell it, she needs to get a husband first ...   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Frenemy of the People" by Nora Olsen

    Clarissa is sitting at an awards banquet when she suddenly realizes she likes pictures of Kimye for both Kim and Kanye and she is totally bi. So she texts to all her friends, "I am totally bi!" Drama and romance ensue ... but not quite with who she expects. I got an advanced copy of this YA lesbian romance, and I’d urge folks to reserve a copy; it’s a delight.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "The Slightest Provocation" by Pam Rosenthal

    A separated couple works to reconcile against a background of political intrigue; sort of "His Gal Friday" as a spy novel set in the Regency.   Read the whole essay.

    Romance novels need a canon

    "Again" by Kathleen Gilles Seidel

    Set among workers on a period soap opera, it manages to be contemporary and historical both at the same time.   Read the whole essay.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

0 Comments

Comment Preview

Your name will appear as username ( settings | log out )

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href=""> <b> <em> <strong> <i> <blockquote>