Steven Spielberg predicts Hollywood’s “implosion”

The legendary film director says that the paradigm of the film industry is changing

Topics: Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Hollywood, Film, Movies,

Speaking at the opening of the Interactive Media Building at the USC School of Cinematic Arts on Wednesday, legendary filmmaker Steven Spielberg predicted a major paradigm shift in the film industry, saying that the industry is in the middle of serious and dangerous transition.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

Steven Spielberg on Wednesday predicted an “implosion” in the film industry is inevitable, whereby a half dozen or so $250 million movies flop at the box office and alter the industry forever. What comes next — or even before then — will be price variances at movie theaters, where “you’re gonna have to pay $25 for the next Iron Man, you’re probably only going to have to pay $7 to see Lincoln.” He also said that Lincoln came “this close” to being an HBO movie instead of a theatrical release.



“That’s the big danger, and there’s eventually going to be an implosion — or a big meltdown. There’s going to be an implosion where three or four or maybe even a half-dozen megabudget movies are going to go crashing into the ground, and that’s going to change the paradigm,” he said.

Speilberg was joined by George Lucas, who echoed his comments: “I think eventually the ‘Lincolns’ will go away and they’re going to be on television,” he said.

Spielberg revealed that “Lincoln” was, in fact, almost a TV movie: “This close — ask HBO — this close,” he said.

“The pathway to get into theaters is really getting smaller and smaller,” Lucas said.

Prachi Gupta

Prachi Gupta is an Assistant News Editor for Salon, focusing on pop culture. Follow her on Twitter at @prachigu or email her at pgupta@salon.com.

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