Finally, there is a yogurt just for men

Companies are launching a slew of new food products that will not emasculate you or strip you of your dignity

Topics: men, Food, women, Gender, Advertising, commerce, , ,

Finally, there is a yogurt <em>just</em> for men (Credit: mihalec via Shutterstock)

Men, if you have ever endured the humiliation of buying Activia or other brands of womanly food products at the grocery store, take heart: There are now food products made just for you.

As the Wall Street Journal reports, more and more men are doing a larger share of the grocery shopping and meal preparation, so companies are trying to make the experience less emasculating by creating products specifically for masculine tastes.

What does that mean? Great question!

Men do not like straws:

Lots of products on food shelves are big no-nos to men, says Lu Ann Williams, head of research for Netherlands-based Innova Market Insights. Others help men feel more, well, manly. “A beer or soda in a long-necked, brown bottle makes a man feel like a man. Drinking out of a straw does not –puckered lips and sunken cheeks are not a good guy look.”

Men do like power animals:

Which helps explain Powerful Yogurt, a Greek yogurt launched in March featuring a bull’s head symbol on red-and-black packaging and an image of stomach muscles next to the slogan “Find Your Inner Abs.”

Men do not like digestive health:

The yogurt shelf “is light blue, light pink, white, and everyone’s talking to women and their digestive health,” says Carlos Ramirez, chief executive of the Miami-based company. “The amount of protein is what guys are looking for.”

Men do like “crunchy” and “ultimate”:



Larger players in the food industry also see new potential in men. General Mills went on a nationwide summer tour to introduce its newly rebranded Helper product line to more men.

Representatives in a red truck offered samples of Crunchy Taco and Ultimate Three Cheese Marinara at fire stations, Nascar races and a Real Men Cook event for fathers in Chicago. (“Ultimate” is a male-friendly buzzword appearing regularly in products like these.)

You can learn more about how to eat like a man here.

Katie McDonough is an assistant editor for Salon, focusing on lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter @kmcdonovgh or email her at kmcdonough@salon.com.

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