Science nerds will love these 7 last-minute Halloween costumes

'Dark matter' never looked better

Topics: Halloween, Science, costumes, geeks, ,

Tired of sci-fi, but still want to embrace your inner geek? We’ve got you covered with these super-last-minute ideas that distill scientific concepts, people, and creations into wearable form. After all, if there is a holiday that allows—even encourages—oversimplifying complexity, it’s Halloween.

Higgs Boson

The decay of a Higgs boson results in the production of two gamma rays
CERN

Modify your Greek god costume using hot glue to secure small pieces of particleboard to a sheet. Fashion the sheet into a toga, and don a wig fit for a god. (Unless you’re naturally gifted with such god-like locks.) You’re the god of particles—the God particle.

What you’ll need: small pieces of particleboard, hot glue, sheet, white wig, thunderbolt, crown

Dark Matter

While proving its existence is difficult, dressing up as dark matter isn’t quite as tricky. Gather as many dark-hued mats as possible (door, place, yoga, car, floor—to name a few) and wear a name tag with the name “Matt” on it. Wear all black and affix said mats to your person. (This is what you get for waiting until the last minute.) Before you head out for the night, read up on the hunt for dark matter and impress trick-or-treaters with your knowledge of theoretical physics.

What you’ll need: several dark mats, name tag

Particle Collider

Large Hadron Collider
CERN

You know those giant underground rings that accelerate hydrogen molecules to near-light speed, only to slam them into each other? Well, they’re basically the same thing as a hula-hoop. OK, not really, but on Halloween, your hula-hoop becomes the Large Hadron Collider and the beads inside become hydrogen molecules. Wrap it in tinfoil or wires to give it that experimental look, and use string to keep it around your waist at all times.

What you’ll need: hula-hoop, wire, tinfoil, string

Water Molecule



This ubiquitous three-atom substance is an easy group costume for the scientifically inclined family of three. Each parent plays the roll of a hydrogen molecule, wearing matching shades of light blue (or any color of your choosing, but since this is water, after all…). Dressed in a darker shade of blue, a child or pet is the oxygen to which the two hydrogen bind.

What you’ll need: two matching blue outfits, child or pet

BlackBerry

BlackBerry

Wikimedia Commons

This once-dominant smartphone brand is now all but dead—perfect for Halloween. Draw the BlackBerry logo onto a shirt, paint your face with zombie makeup, and add blood for effect. It might be dead, but all good Halloween costumes are.

What you’ll need: old shirt, permanent marker, zombie makeup, fake blood (Optional: Apple genius, toy knife)

Marie Curie

She is one of the most famous scientists of the early twentieth century, and her study of radiation paved the way for countless subsequent advances. It was Marie Curie’s dedication to science–and prolonged exposure to radioactivity–that likely killed her. To emulate Curie, dress in a modest, simple dress, wear a lab coat, and carry glow sticks in your pockets to represent the test tubes of radioactive isotopes. If you want to go all out, you can apply glow-in-the-dark face paint or nail polish.

What you’ll need: lab coat, glow sticks (Optional: face paint, nail polish)

Red Tide

An algal bloom
NOAA

Caused by the sudden population boom of reddish-brown algae, this phenomenon occurs both naturally, and in recent years from human activity. Agricultural runoff is one of the main sources of red-tide-producing algae blooms. Dress in all red and wear the Tide detergent logo on your chest. If you want to wear a blue or red cape to add some motion to your ocean, go ahead.

What you’ll need: red clothing, printed or cutout Tide logo (Optional: red or blue cape)









Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 11
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott and the friends with whom he recorded in middle school in Texas (photo courtesy of Dan Pickering)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Heatmiser publicity shot (L-R: Tony Lash, Brandt Peterson, Neil Gust, Elliott Smith) (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott and JJ Gonson (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    "Stray" 7-inch, Cavity Search Records (photo courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott's Hampshire College ID photo, 1987

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott with "Le Domino," the guitar he used on "Roman Candle" (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Full "Roman Candle" record cover (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Elliott goofing off in Portland (courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    Heatmiser (L-R: Elliott Smith, Neil Gust, Tony Lash, Brandt Peterson)(courtesy of JJ Gonson photography)

    "Roman Candle" turns 20: Secrets of Elliott Smith's accidental masterpiece (slideshow)

    The Greenhouse Sleeve -- Cassette sleeve from Murder of Crows release, 1988, with first appearance of Condor Avenue (photo courtesy of Glynnis Fawkes)

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

Loading Comments...