Corrections

Salon strives to publish accurate information at all times. Minor errors of spelling, punctuation and the like will be corrected on our website without notice. When we correct significant errors of fact or substance, we will note the correction here and also on the page containing the corrected version of the original article. If you think Salon has published something in error, please email readermail@salon.com.

2014 Corrections

Four of contributor CJ Werleman’s stories for Salon, three of which were originally published by our partner site, AlterNet, have been discovered to contain passages that were either improperly sourced or plagiarized. In the interest of transparency, we have emboldened the sections of these articles in question and included hyperlinks to the original source material. Salon deeply regrets the oversight.

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The Oct. 18 story “Amazon’s Wal-Mart Problem” has been updated to correct the description of Annie Lowrey’s argument, and to provide added detail on pro- and anti-monopoly arguments.

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In the October 5 story, “Why the GOP hates U.S. history: Inconvenient truths that freak out American conservatives,” the battle over a new U.S. history curriculum was misattributed to a school district in Denver. The controversy actually took place in a suburb of Denver, in Jefferson County, Colorado.

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In the September 16 story, “The Satanic Temple’s hilarious response to a pro-religion court ruling”, the deck of the story originally misstated that the Satanic Temple had handed out the pamphlets. They have yet to hand out the activity books. Salon regrets the error.

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The September 4 story, “10 of the most evil medical experiments in history,” originally published by our partner website AlterNet, incorrectly stated that Dr. Eugene Saenger was awarded a gold medal by the American College of Radiology. In fact, he received the award from the Radiological Society of North America. Salon regrets the error.

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The August 16 story, “The truth about the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge‘” previously misidentified Professor Robert Frank’s book. It is “What Price the Moral High Ground?” not “Giving: Western Ideas of Philanthropy.” Salon regrets the error.

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The August 18 story, “Rick Perry’s indictment is bad for Democrats,” erroneously stated that like Rick Perry, Wisconsin governor Scott Walker has also been indicted. This has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The August 2 story, “4 reasons GOP’s new ‘war for women’ is a ridiculous joke,” first published by our partner website AlterNet, incorrectly suggested that prescription birth control offers protection from sexually transmitted diseases. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 28 story “New Republic/Ivy League Hypocrisy Watch” misattributed a quote by George Scialabba to Russell Jacoby. The story has been corrected.

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The July 23 story, “The chilling reason our government wants to erase this man from history,” first published by Creative Time Reports, erroneously stated that the visitors of Communications Management Unit prisoners are subjected to a strip-search prior to visitation. In fact, the prisoners themselves are subjected to a strip-search. Salon regrets this error.

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The July 15 story, “Why Christians get the 10 commandments wrong,” first published by our partner site AlterNet, failed to acknowledge that the 10 commandments are repeated, approximately, in the book of Deuteronomy. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 11 story, “Why CNN is so afraid of admitting that America’s terror attacks are right-wing,” first published by our partner site AlterNet, originally stated that Jerad Miller was killed by his wife, Amanda. He was in fact killed in a shootout with police. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 11 story, “Elizabeth Warren faces right-wing stooge: Here’s who’s quietly funding her top critic,” initially confused the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, where Matthew Chingos has not received support, with the Spencer Foundation, where he has. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 3 story, “Tea Party’s double agent: Sen. Ron Johnson has a new agenda,” initially referred to an interview Johnson gave with the Ayn Rand Institute. It was with the Atlas Society instead. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 18 story “Is Amazon ruining dating in Seattle?”, first published by our partner site The Daily Dot, incorrectly attributed the practice of offering “comfort women” in World War II. It was the Japanese Imperial Army that provided women, mostly from occupied countries, to its soldiers. Salon regrets the error.

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The headline of the May 12 story “Koch-funded PAC slammed! Global warming is “not something you turn on and off” originally misidentified the Koch-funded group Americans for Prosperity as a super PAC. Salon regrets this error.

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The April 21 story “Saudi prince hunts down 2,100 protected birds in 21 days” originally misidentified the subject as Prince Fahad al Saud, who goes by @yolofahad on Instagram. The report in question actually concerns Prince Fahd bin Sultan. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 5 story “Woman allegedly fired for checking her email while on medical leave,” originally published by our partner website The Daily Dot, originally stated that the woman in question had been dismissed while on maternity leave. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the March 28 story “Christie’s creepy misogyny” put the word “erratic” in quotes when describing how the Mastro report described Bridget Kelly. Though many published reports put the word in quotes, the actual report never uses that precise word. It calls Kelly’s behavior “aberrational,” among other loaded negative adjectives. Salon regrets not searching the document to make sure “erratic” indeed appeared. The story has been corrected.

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The March 4 article titled “BP fails to get out of compensating oil spill victims” originally misstated BP’s settlement with oil spill victims as being for $9.2 million. In reality, the settlement was for the sum of $9.2 billion.

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The Feb. 10 article originally titled “10 worst right-wing moments of the week — Victoria Jackson is running for Congress!” first published by our partner site AlterNet.org, incorrectly stated that Victoria Jackson was running for a seat in Congress. Jackson is actually running for a seat on a county commission in Tennessee. Salon regrets this error.

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The Jan. 27 article originally titled “10 worst right-wing moments of the week — Huckabee’s libido and the persecuted 1% edition“ first published by our partner site AlterNet.org, incorrectly stated that Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler was from Montana.  She represents the 4th congressional district in Missouri. Salon regrets the error.

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The Jan. 19 article originally titled “What I learned from a week on food stamps: Paul Ryan couldn’t be any more wrong” has been updated. An earlier version of this article stated that a single New Yorker making less than the Gross Monthly Income Limit of $1,174 would qualify for maximum $200 a month.  That Gross Monthly Income Limit figure was from 2010, and has been updated to reflect numbers as of October 1, 2013.

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The Jan. 2 article titled “10 signs that religious fundamentalism is going down,” originally published by our partner site AlterNet, stated that marriage equality became law in Ohio in December 2013. It did not. It also suggested that Cameron Diaz is an atheist. She has stated that she is not. Salon regrets the errors.

2013 Corrections

The Dec. 15 article originally titled “Facebook released my private messages from college,” first published by our partner site The Daily Dot, incorrectly stated that Facebook accidentally released the author’s private messages. Facebook clarifies that they were in fact wall posts. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 10 article “4 African leaders who learned nothing from Nelson Mandela,” originally published by our partner site GlobalPost, incorrectly stated that Equatorial Guinea was originally a Portuguese colony. It was in fact a Spanish colony. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 7 story “Millennial, hardworking, homeless” has been clarified to note that the D.C. General shelter has changed management since sex allegations arose there. [Clarification made 12/10/13]

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The Dec. 5 article “Wall street is designing the future of public education as a money-making machine,” originally published by our partner site AlterNet, was amended to remove a reference to ERN’s contributions to SFER, and to clarify the nature of Matt Kramer’s relationship to SFER. He is a former, not current, board member. Adiitionally, three, not two, incumbents were reelected in the Atlanta race, and an language was added to clarify the nature of the malfunctions that occured with Amplify’s donated tablets. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 4 article “Max Blumenthal: I knew Alterman would freak out“ quotes author Max Blumenthal suggesting that Eric Alterman “call[ed] on” his allies to criticize the former’s book. This could not be corroborated and has since been clarified. Salon regrets the oversight. [Clarification made 12/11/13]

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The Nov. 17 article ”Meet the Catholic extremists who could shatter the church” initially misstated the University where Gavin D’Costa teaches. He is a professor at the University of Bristol. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 11/20/13] The piece also incorrectly stated that Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre refused to sign Vatican II documents. [Correction made 11/25/13]

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The Nov. 13 story “Corporate America’s new scam: Industry P.R. firm poses as think tank! inadvertently confused the American Beverage Association (ABA) with the American Beverage Institute (ABI).  While the ABA is the trade group for the sugary drink industry, the ABI is a group representing the interests of the alcoholic beverage industry. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 11/14/13]

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The Nov. 3 story “Stop Calling JFK Conservative” mistakenly stated that a Kennedy Supreme Court nominee who’d written the dissent in Roe v. Wade had also written the concurring opinion in the case legalizing the use of contraceptives. In fact, he and another Kennedy appointee, Arthur Goldberg, wrote the concurring opinion. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 11/4/13]

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The Nov. 1 article “4 Insane things rich people blow their money on” initially listed an expensive yacht that was a hoax. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 11/1/13]

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The Oct. 25 article “How shameless con artists took over the GOP” originally stated that Ted Cruz’s father, Rafael Cruz, is a member of Purifying Ministries, founded by Suzanne Hinn. However, it is not clear whether the Texas-based Purifying Ministries is the same group founded by Hinn. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Sept. 22 article “5 most offensive Asian characters in TV history” originally stated that Fox News, rather than Fox, has refused to reshoot the pilot episode of “Dads.” The piece has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Sept. 16 article “Chickens Are Killing the Planet” failed to distinguish between egg-laying and broiler chickens in a paragraph about how chickens are raised. The story has been corrected.
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The July 26 article “Leave Huma Abedin alone!” originally published by PolicyMic, mischaracterized a tweet by Lauren Wolfe. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 19 article “Don’t fall for Wal-Mart’s latest hypocrisy” originally suggested that approximately 80 percent of Wal-Mart workers are on food stamps. While that statistic has been used frequently, studies have not verified it. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 1 article “We must hate our children” originally noted that 10 states spend more on prison than on all education programs. It should have said “higher education.” Salon regrets the error.

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The June 24 article “Pot farmers threaten endangered species,” originally published by Earth Island Journal, said that Humbolt resident Kerry Reynolds launched the campaign against rodenticide. In fact, the campaign was a joint effort by Penny Andres, Uti Deva, and Kerry Reynolds. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 22 article “Klansman and accomplice charged for building radiation gun,” originally published by the Southern Poverty Law Center, contained a photograph that suggested a possible connection between the Ku Klux Klan and the Nation of Israel. The photograph has been replaced, and Salon regrets the error.

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The June 13 article “Dark money buys state supreme court races,” originally published by our partner the Center for Public Integrity, reported that Carrie Severino, chief counsel to the Judicial Crisis Network, had said that the Judicial Crisis Network’s strategy was to end judicial appointments and switch to judicial elections. Severino says she did not make this statement and that the JCN’s “objective is to promote judicial selection methods – be they elective or appointive – that are accountable to the people they serve. . . . [N]either I nor JCN has ever engaged in a strategy to end judicial appointments, nor have we promoted state judicial elections as a one-size-fits-all approach. On the contrary, we have applauded efforts to establish a federal style of judicial appointments in some states.”
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The May 28 article “Back to Fukushima: ‘It was all very apocalyptic,’” originally published by The Walrus, falsely stated that 20,000 people died as a result of the Fukushima nuclear meltdown. Approximately 16,000 were killed by an earthquake and resulting tsunami. The article also incorrectly linked to World Health Organization and Greenpeace reports. Salon regrets the errors.

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The May 22 article “Is Pittsburgh the new Portland?” contained the wrong byline. The author of the piece is Jim Russell, geographer and contributor to Pacific Standard Magazine. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 21 article “Anyone regret slashing National Weather Service budget now?” mistakenly attributed the quote of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce directly to the American Institute of Physics. The Institute, however, was merely quoting the Commerce Secretary in its newsletter to its members. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 2 article “What anti-LGBT activists say ‘off the record’” wrongly attributed a quote referring to Jeremy Hooper as “twice the son of hell” to Laurie Higgins of the Illinois Family Institute. Salon regrets the error.
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The April 12 article “On Gosnell “blackout,” where were conservatives before this week?” misstated the number of stories the National Review has written about Kermitt Gosnell. While a search of their website turned up zero results, they have in fact written about it on occasion.

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The April 4 article “Spare us your salary sequestration stunts” misstated the president’s salary. It is $400,000 a year, not $200,000. The story has been corrected, Salon regrets the error.

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The March 17 article “‘Fiscally conservative’ lawmaker happy to spend taxpayer millions defending unconstitutional abortion ban” incorrectly attributed a quote speculating about Gov. Jack Dalrymple’s position on a six-week abortion ban to Lt. Gov. Drew H. Wrigley. The quote came from state Sen. Dwight Cook. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/19/13]

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The March 17 article “Holograms to preserve Holocaust survivors’ legacies” wrongly stated that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., was working with researchers at the University of Southern California to incorporate these holograms into their collection. The museum is not involved in the project, and has no current plans to use the holograms. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 3 article “Football’s death spiral” originally indicated that a study that found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the brains of 33 deceased NFL players was conducted by the National Institutes of Health. The research was actually performed at Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 2/4/13.]
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The Feb. 3 article Take ecstasy, save your relationship” did not make explicit that Oxford ethicist Brian Earp does not advocate the taking of illegal drugs. There has also been a line added to contextualize Earp’s thoughts on the ethical implications of chemically-sustained love between parent and child in the last paragraph. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 1 article ”How Netflix Pulls Our Strings” incorrectly defined an exabyte as 1,000 gigabytes. An exabyte is 1 bllion gigabytes. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/1/13]

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The Jan 25 article ”Will Computers Kill Gun Control?” initially referred to “automatic weapons” instead of “guns.” The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 1/25/12]

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On Jan. 22, Salon republished an article from one of our content partners, the Weeklings, that was sympathetic to unfounded 9/11 conspiracies. The article slipped through our usual review process, and was clearly not up to our standards; we removed it as soon as it was brought to our attention by readers. Salon has a long history of debunking fringe conspiracists — around Sept. 11, and more recently, Sandy Hook — and are proud of those efforts. We regret this oversight.

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A Jan. 16 article entitled Postal Service on brink of bankruptcy used the term “bailout” as a potential solution to the service’s financial ills. Salon regrets the error.

2012 Corrections

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A Dec. 22 article entitled “Most racist restaurant in America?” incorrectly suggested that Kentucky’s Maker’s Mark Bourbon House and Lounge was owned by Maker’s Mark. The story has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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A Dec. 7 article entitled “Video games are designed to get you hooked” incorrectly stated that the American Psychological Association is unwilling to recognize video game addiction as an official diagnosis. In fact, it is the American Psychiatric Association that the publishes the diagnosis manual. The story has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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A Dec. 7 article “Obama inauguration raises $40M+” incorrectly attributed 2009 inauguration fundraising figures and that inauguration’s policy not to accept corporate money to the 2013 inauguration. The text has been corrected. We regret the errors.

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A Sept. 27 article incorrectly stated that the Screaming Sky Gallery is in Seattle. It is in Portland, Ore. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/27/12]

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The Sept. 26 article “Must-see morning clip” described dialogue from “The View” as depicted in a clip from “Conan” that was not an accurate depiction of original dialogue. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/26/12]

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The Sept. 19 article ”Will Chick-fil-A stop funding anti-gay groups?” initially quoted an incorrect press release from Civil Rights Agenda that said Focus on the Family had been classified as a hate group. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/20/12]
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The Sept. 1o article Who’s to blame for NPR’s super-white book list? initially mischaracterized Pamela Paul’s role as a “judge” rather than as a member of an expert panel. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/11/12]

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The Aug. 27 article “Can Self-Publishing Buy Respect” incorrectly stated that Publishers Weekly sells reviews. PW does not, in fact, sell reviews for self-published or traditionally published books. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/29/12]
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The Aug. 14 article “Cut, Paste, Plagiarize” incorrectly stated that Elizabeth Flock was “pushed from her job” at the Washington Post. In fact, she resigned voluntarily. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 8/15/12]
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In the Aug. 10 story “Don’t Put Mountain Dew in a Baby Bottle” the correct name for the heathcare model referenced is CenteringPregnancy, not Health Centering. And the program was developed for prenatal care, rather than neonatal care, as the piece originally said. The story has been corrected. ‬ [Correction made 8/10/12]
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The July 11 article “Ten Bands I Will Be Forced to Listen to in Hell” originally misstated the name of the band They Might Be Giants. It also included text in the Pearl Jam section that the author did not intend for the final draft. The story has been corrected.‬ [Correction made 7/11/12]

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The June 23, 2012, story “LGBT’s Worst Foe: The Closet Monster” had several errors in describing former Rep. Bob Bauman, R-Md. We originally wrote that Bauman “voted to deny federal funds to lawyers working on behalf of gay rights,” but Bauman opposed federal subsidies for all lawyers, not just those representing gay rights. It also erroneously suggested that Bauman tried to solicit sex from an underage male prostitute; but the male in question was 16, an adult under the laws of Washington, D.C. Bauman also did not resign from his reelection campaign; he lost in the general election. Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 7/4/12]
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The June 23, 2012, story “LGBT’s Worst Foe: The Closet Monster” incorrectly said which state former U.S. Rep. Ed Schrock represented. He was a Republican from Virginia. We also had a photo of the wrong man accompanying the post. Both mistakes have been corrected. [Correction made 6/25/12]
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The April 19 story “Can Mitt Talk to Women” originally said that Carrel Hilton Sheldon had an abortion “late” in her pregnancy after discovering she had a life-threatening blood clot. Sheldon had the abortion early in her pregnancy, after eight weeks. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/16/12]
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‪The April 30 article “Occupy’s Other Big Test” originally implied that MoveOn created and named several “99 Percent” initiatives, including the 99% Voter Pledge. While MoveOn has sponsored these campaigns, it has not, in most cases, created or named them. The language of the piece has been updated to reflect this.‬ [Correction made 5/3/12]

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In the Feb. 7, 2012, story “Will Obama Compromise on Birth Control,” a quote by an unnamed reporter was erroneously attributed to ABC News reporter Jake Tapper. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/8/12]

 

2011 Corrections

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A quote that was erroneously attributed to Michelle Malkin has been removed from the June 21 story “The Man Behind the Glitter Revolution.” The quote was in fact from a commenter on Malkin’s site. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/24/11]

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The June 20, 2011, story “Could Flogging Solve Our Prison Crisis” initially stated that “the Corrections Corporation of America helped draft anti-immigration laws,” a reference to the draft legislation that later became Arizona SB 1070. CCA has brought it to our attention that although CCA did have a representative at the ALEC meeting where model legislation similar to 1070 was drafted, CCA was not involved in drafting the language. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/8/12]

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The June 2 story “Sasha Grey joins Lindsay Lohan in gallery shorts” incorrectly identified the director of this film as Todd Phillips. The artist is, in fact, Richard Phillips. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 6/2/11]

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The May 6 story “Lady Gaga on ‘American Idol’” erroneously summarized year-old reports about Lady Gaga’s May 5, 2010, appearance on “American Idol,” mistakenly suggesting that her appearance was on May 5, 2011. Salon has corrected the story and regrets the error. [Correction made 5/6/11]

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The Feb. 28 article “Proactiv’s Celebrity Shell Game” incorrectly suggested that Dr. Benabio said the “before and after” pictures used by Proactiv were Photoshopped. The dermatologist did not make that claim. Further, the basic Proactiv system costs $19.95, not $59.95, as the article originally stated. Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 3/21/11]

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We have altered the language of the Dec. 30 story “Judith Miller: From the Times to the Nuts” after several media outlets amended their coverage and we received a request from Newsmax. We never intended to imply that its business practices violate any laws. [Correction made 1/18/11]

 

2010 Corrections

 

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The Dec. 16 story “Keith Olbermann ‘suspends’ Twitter account over Assange furor” incorrectly stated that Assange had been charged in the rape case in Sweden. He had been arrested in London on an extradition warrant, but had not been charged. [Correction made 12/16/10.]

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The Sept. 6 story “Inside the Strange World of Hoarders” stated that the Beales in the film “Grey Gardens” were sisters. They were mother and daughter. [Correction made 9/7/10.]

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Joan Walsh’s Aug. 25 blog post “Beck has a scheme” was originally accompanied by an iconic photo of Martin Luther King Jr. that was mistakenly used and attributed to the Library of Congress. The photo is actually the copyrighted work of Bob Adelman/Magnum Photos. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/26/10]

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The story “Jon Stewart Was Born to Bash Obama” contained three inaccuracies: Stewart began his “Daily Show” tenure in 1999, so the assertion that he had never done the job during a Democratic presidency was incorrect. The “Daily Show” segment on Obama’s All Star pitch aired on July 15, 2009, not June 15, 2009. And the banner displayed during a satiric bit on the BP oil spill read “Commission Accomplished,” not “Mission Accomplished.” Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 6/23/10]

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The June 16 Broadsheet post “Study: Fat Women Starved of Sex” originally stated that “obese men had just as much nookie as average guys.” It should have read, “obese men were just as likely to have had a sexual partner in the last 12 months as average guys.” [Correction made 6/16/10]

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The May 17 Broadsheet post “Miss USA Stripping Scandal: How Shocking!” incorrectly stated that Miss Nevada Katie Rees lost her title after the emergence of a “hardcore pornographic photo shoot.” The photos in question were not actually pornographic. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/17/10]

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The May 3 story “United and Continental Tie the Knot” mistakenly said that United and Continental logged 177 million and 133 million revenue passenger kilometers, respectively. That should be 17.7 billion and 13.3 billion. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/11/10]

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A Broadsheet item about blogger Judith Torrea said that the death toll from the drug war in Ciudad Juárez was roughly 22,700. That is the figure for all of Mexico. The correct death toll for Juárez is roughly 4,324. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 4/15/10]

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In the April 5 story “My Antidepressant Gets Hard to Swallow,” the author of the book “Listening to Prozac” was misidentified. The author is Peter D. Kramer. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 4/5/10]

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The March 31 story “We Should Be Policing Wall Street” incorrectly stated that a whistle-blower who’d alerted Ernst & Young to fraud had been fired by Ernst & Young. He was fired by Lehman Brothers. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/31/10]

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The March 16 story “Bring It On, Ayn Rand Geeks” originally stated that Ron Paul’s son, Rand Paul, was named after Ayn Rand. Rand Paul claims that is not true. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/17/10]

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The Feb. 3 “James O’Keefe’s Race Problem” reported that O’Keefe, the
conservative activist arrested on charges he plotted to tamper with
Sen. Mary Landrieu’s phone lines, helped plan a conference on “Race
and Conservatism” that featured white nationalist Jared Taylor. The
freelance photographer who attended the event, and snapped O’Keefe’s
photo there, now says the right-wing provocateur helped out at the
conference, but cannot confirm that he helped plan it. The story has been corrected.

The article also said that O’Keefe was terminated by the right-wing
Leadership Institute in 2008, after videos were released of O’Keefe
calling Planned Parenthood and offering to donate money to abort
black babies. He was let go in 2007. Leadership Institute co-founder Morton Blackwell told the New York Times O’Keefe “wanted to do
sting operations that would affect legislation; he made some calls
which have been covered in the news media to Planned Parenthood. That
was beyond the scope of what we had hired him to do. We are an
educational organization. We are not an activist organization.” Blackwell says he told O’Keefe to choose between his job and his activism, “and he said he was committed to the activism,” according to the Times. The
date of O’Keefe’s termination has been corrected, and Blackwell’s
explanation has been added to the story.

Also, David Almasi is the director of Project 21, not the founder, as originally
stated.

Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 2/5/10]

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The Jan. 25 article “Is the President Panicking” originally stated that Fox News led the charge against Bill Clinton in the ’94 midterm elections. Fox News did not come into being until 1996. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 1/27/10]

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Heather Michon’s Jan. 19 article “Is It Racist to Report on Looting in Haiti?” neglected to attribute an observation about the connotations of the word “looting” in multiple languages to a post by Marc Herman at Global Voices. [Correction made 1/22/10]

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A Jan. 23 books feature about Chinua Achebe contained a typo in the name of the author. It is Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, not Chinamanda Ngozi Adichie.

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A Jan. 13 War Room post incorrectly stated that the Federation for American Immigration Reform had provided funding for Americans for Legal Immigration PAC, citing the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Web site. But the Web site says only that FAIR “supports” ALIPAC. In fact, ALIPAC has not received funding from the federation. [Correction made 1/14/10]

 

2009 Corrections

 

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In Stephanie Zacharek’s Dec. 9 review of “A Single Man,” it was incorrectly
stated that Tom Ford designed for Yves Saint Laurent before moving to
Gucci. In fact, Ford worked as creative director of Gucci from 1996 to
2004, and also designed for Yves Saint Laurent after that house was
acquired by Gucci in 1999. [Correction made 12/14/09]

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In the Dec. 9 story, Price Check: Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label the article misstated the price differences between retail bottles of wine, and restaurant bottles. The price difference numbers provided included an erroneous extra 100%.

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In the Dec. 8 Broadsheet post “‘Curing’ Gays Turns to Killing,” Richard Cohen, author of “Coming Out Straight: Understanding and Healing Homosexuality,” was incorrectly referred to as a Washington Post columnist. There is a newspaper columnist of the same name, but he is a different person. [Correction made 12/8/09]

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The Aug. 14 story “Whose side of the road are you on,” incorrectly stated that Samoa was the first country to change the side of the road it drove on since 1967. In fact, Iceland made the change in 1968 and Burma in 1970. [Correction made 8/13/09]

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In the Aug. 12 story “Obama’s Healthcare Horror,” we incorrectly said that the White House counsel had been fired. In fact, there has been speculation in the press reports that the White House counsel will be fired — but he has not been. [Correction made 8/13/09]

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The July 28 story href=”http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2009/07/28/immigrant_president/”>”Immigrants
Should Be Eligible for the Presidency” originally contained a
paragraph stating that several Founding Fathers, including Alexander
Hamilton, were ineligible for the presidency because of the
circumstances of their birth. This paragraph was inaccurate and has been
deleted from the story. [Correction made 7/29/09]

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In the June 22 Since You Asked column “I’m Stuck in Atlanta, He’s Stuck in Seattle,” certain identifying details have been removed to protect the privacy of the people involved. [Correction made 6/23/09]

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The June 6 story “The Learjet Repo Man” initially stated that Pat Sage is Nick Popovich’s wife. She is his ex-wife. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 6/11/09]

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The April 13 “Ask a Wingnut” column “The
Wingnut Explains Michele Bachmann”
originally stated that Minnesota
was a major producer of coal. The article has been corrected to say that
Minnesota’s electricity production is heavily dependent on coal. Salon
regrets the error. [Correction made 4/13/09]

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A March 25 Broadsheet post “Anti-abortion Stunt Girl Strikes Again” incorrectly stated that Live Action’s Lila Rose project was funded by Dr. James Dobson. It is, in fact, not funded by Dobson. The article has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/26/09]

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The March 18 story “Just How Bad Off Is the Republican Party (Part 2)?” originally stated that Kansas Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson would not be running for governor in 2010 because of questions about a relationship with an aide. In fact, Parkinson is not running so that he can tend to his family business. A researcher confused Parkinson with former Kansas Attorney General Paul Morrison, who left office in 2008 because of a sex scandal. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/18/09]

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The March 11 story “Why Is Jim Cramer Shouting at Me?” originally stated that Wall Street’s closing bell is at 4:30 p.m. It is at 4 p.m., and the story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/12/09]

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The March 4 story “Predatory Lending With a Smiley Face” stated that “no-doc, option ARM, cash-out and other toxic mortgages” were still advertised on mortgage broker Ty Youngblood’s Web site at the time of the story’s publication. The story has been corrected and now reads: “no-doc, option ARM, cash-out and other toxic mortgages, some of which were still advertised on his Web site earlier this year, but are no longer.” Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/5/09]

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The Feb. 13 story “Pardon the Bush Miscreants” misrepresented a Gallup poll. The story has been corrected and now reads: “In a poll released yesterday by the Gallup Organization, 38 percent favors criminal sanctions against officials who authorized torture or other outrages in the “war on terror,” while another 24 percent favors an investigation without criminal charges. At the same time, 34 percent prefers that the Obama administration simply leave its wayward predecessors be.” Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/17/09]

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In the Feb. 11 story “Bigfoot Lives,” a quote by photographer Jeremy Holden read: “I had spent time in New Guinea trying to photograph a habituated
 troop of 19 chimpanzees.” It should have read: “I had spent time in Guinea trying to photograph a habituated
 troop of 19 chimpanzees.” The story has been corrected. [Correction made 2/12/09]