New in paperback

Susan Faludi's "Stiffed," Matt Ridley's "Genome" and an amusing study of why men avoid marriage.


the staff of Salon Books
December 5, 2000 1:00AM (UTC)

Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man by Susan Faludi
The Pulitzer Prize-winning feminist author of "Backlash" argues that our culture has contributed to the problems of modern manhood.
Reviewed by Jonathan Miles [09/30/99]

Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader by Anne Fadiman
"An unapologetic confession of raging bibliophilia" that is a "modest, charming, lighthearted gambol among the stacks."
Reviewed by Dan Cryer [10/07/98]

Advertisement:

Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters by Matt Ridley
This science writer digs into specific genes, describes the roles they play in our bodies and explores the implications of genetic research.

Howard Hawks: The Grey Fox of Hollywood by Todd McCarthy
The great film director "lives and breathes" in this biography.
Reviewed by Jonathan Lethem [07/14/97]

Standup Guy: Manhood After Feminism by Michael Segell
A quest to find out why young men avoid marriage and fatherhood; the author interviews Promise Keepers and New Warriors, and even examines his own relationships.
Reviewed by Cary Tennis [06/17/99]

Advertisement:

In Nevada: The Land, the People, God, and Chance by David Thomson and 24/7: Living It Up and Doubling Down in the New Las Vegas by Andres Martinez
In these two books, the authors attempt to understand their fascination with Nevada -- one looks at the Nevada of military test sites and empty deserts, the other at Las Vegas' glitzy and cheap gambling culture.
Reviewed by Jeff Stark [12/01/99]

The Predictors: How a Band of Maverick Physicists Used Chaos Theory to Trade Their Way to a Fortune on Wall Street by Thomas A. Bass
Reviewed by Lee Dembart [10/14/99]

Passage to Juneau: A Sea and Its Meanings by Jonathan Raban
"A multilayered and affecting account of sailing" that is not an adventure-gone-wrong tale; instead, "the book's genesis lay, refreshingly, in contemplation."
Reviewed by Scott Sutherland [10/26/99]

Advertisement:

The Coming of the Night by John Rechy
An exploration of gay desire in Los Angeles during the years before AIDS.
Reviewed by Frank Browning [09/08/99]

Waiting by Ha Jin
In this National Book Award winner, a Chinese man is caught between his marriage, his love for another woman and centuries of custom.

Advertisement:

My Kitchen Wars by Betty Fussell
The cookbook author and ex-wife of Paul Fussell's mordant memoir recounts "a lifetime's worth of eating and cooking, showing how closely her meals were bound with her life."
Reviewed by Pete Wells [11/24/99]

Why They Kill: The Discoveries of a Maverick Criminologist by Richard Rhodes
An "amalgam of biography, sociological theory, psychohistory and social criticism" that attempts to explain human acts of violence.
Reviewed by JoAnn Gutin [09/28/99]

How to Stop Time: Heroin From A to Z by Ann Marlowe
A memoir that explores the moral, psychological and cultural territory of smack.
Reviewed by Craig Seligman [10/01/99]

Advertisement:

Sketches From a Life by George F. Kennan
A memoir of 20th century history and politics from the former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union.

In Our Time: Memoir of a Revolution by Susan Brownmiller
The feminist activist and author of "Against Our Will" recalls her experience with the feminist movement.

Strange Beauty: Murray Gell-Mann and the Revolution in Twentieth-Century Physics by George Johnson
A biography of the man who revolutionized modern particle physics.

Advertisement:

For Common Things: Irony, Trust, and Commitment in America Today by Jedediah Purdy
A 24-year-old borrows from a range of literary and cultural sources to call for civic reengagement.
Reviewed by Caleb Crain [09/07/99]

The Tiny One by Eliza Minot
An 8-year-old girl loses her mother in a car accident and examines the details of that fateful day.
Reviewed by Lindsay Amon [11/08/99]

Ghosts of Cape Sabine: The Harrowing True Story of the Greely Expedition by Leonard F. Guttridge
A true thriller about 25 men who, in 1881, sailed to establish a scientific base in the Arctic region and met a dismal fate.
Reviewed by Jonathan Miles [01/21/00]


the staff of Salon Books

MORE FROM the staff of Salon Books


Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Books

Fearless journalism
in your inbox every day

Sign up for our free newsletter

• • •