Yo-yo man

I’m with a man who says he doesn’t believe in love, but he’s loving when he’s with me. Help!


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Cary Tennis
April 22, 2003 7:03pm (UTC)

Dear Cary,

Around four months ago I started dating this guy, "Steve," who I met over the Internet. Steve is tall, funny and smart. He tells me that I am wonderful. He is also petrified that I will turn into his ex-wife (he divorced three years ago) and try to control his life, beat him up, and keep him from friends and family. He tells me that he cares for me deeply but he can't love me because love sucks and he is never going to do it again. When we are together he is very affectionate and a fantastic lover. When he is away he forgets to call me, forgets our dates, and seems irritated when I contact him. So we go back and forth, seeing each other about once or twice a week.

A little about me: About a year and a half ago my husband of three years and boyfriend of 10 said that he didn't love me and possibly never did. We are divorced and I feel that I am a better person without my ex. I know, however, that I have residual feelings of inadequacy and a lack of faith in my intuition. Therefore, when Steve doesn't call, I start to think that all of his talk of "You are great, beautiful, smart, sexy" is just polite talk and he really isn't interested. Also I started dating my ex when I was 18 and am now 29, and Steve is basically my second boyfriend (and my second lover) so I am inexperienced in the arena of relationships.

Should I just cut my losses and tell Steve that he is obviously not ready for a relationship? Should I take a step back and just wait for Steve to be more interested in me? Or am I being really clingy? I get terrible advice from friends: Play uninterested, play dumb, pretend that you don't care, etc.

Hope you have better advice,

Ms. Yo-Yoed

Dear Ms. Yo-Yoed,

I hope I have better advice than your friends, too, though I think if you look hard enough at what your friends are suggesting, you'll see that they and I both want much the same thing: for you to gain some control over your fate, to not just be reacting to what Steve is doing.

However, I am not a big fan of pretending. When you pretend, unless you're a good actor, you leave your message open to interpretation. If you want him to believe that you don't care, go ahead and tell him you don't care. Give him the benefit of being able to respond to a clear message. But don't play with his head or act coy. Because unless you were born to be coy, unless coy is who you are, he might not read coy even though you're doing coy all over the place; instead, he may read goofy or strange or mentally ill.

For those reasons, I am more in favor of the declarative sentence. (I'm also a big fan of the occasional bald-faced lie, but in this case, I think the truth will get the right results.) Tell him, for instance, that when you heard him say he couldn't love you it sounded to you like he was saying he couldn't love you. Ask him if you heard him correctly. If you did hear him correctly, then utter this declarative sentence: I am looking for a man to love me. Tell him you spy daylight between your desires and what he is offering.

I suggest doing this because you need your situation spelled out clearly. Once it's spelled out, I think you'll see that this man is not the man you are looking for. You are looking for love and he's told you he can't do that. But don't tell Steve he's not ready for a relationship. You have no idea what Steve is ready for. Tell him you're not ready for a relationship with a man who can't love you.

Then, as you move on and look for the right man, concentrate on the observable facts; state clearly what you want and look for agreement. If you don't get agreement, take it at face value: He doesn't want to give you what you want. Many negotiable aspects of a relationship can be spelled out: How frequently you get together, whether fidelity is required, is he looking to get married and raise kids, that kind of thing. The less intuiting you have to do, if you feel your intuition about men is weak, the less trouble you'll get into. I'm not saying get it in writing, exactly, but be explicit about what's going on in your head. And pay attention to what he says and assume that he means it.

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Want more advice from Cary? Read yesterday's column.


Cary Tennis

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