Paul Wolfowitz's next disaster

What's a guy do after orchestrating a failed war and bringing the World Bank to a screeching halt?


Andrew Leonard
May 22, 2008 11:34PM (UTC)

Last we saw Paul "everything-I-touch-turns-to-quagmire" Wolfowitz, the architect of the Iraq war and miserable failure as president of the World Bank was licking his wounds as a fellow at the right-wing think tank, the American Enterprise Institute. Now comes word via Michael Turton's View From Taiwan, that Wolfowitz has accepted the position of chairman of the board of the U.S.-Taiwan Business Council.

The U.S.-Taiwan Business Council describes itself as "a non-profit organization dedicated to developing the trade and business relationship between the United States and Taiwan." The gig is reputed to be non-paying, so maybe, in the best of all possible worlds, the Taiwanese can hope that Wolfowitz doesn't feel burdened by the necessity of putting too much effort into the job.

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Because his track record, to put it mildly, just isn't good. If Taiwan's affairs proceed in a fashion analogous to the fortunes of the Iraq war or Wolfowitz's campaign against corruption at the World Bank, then we can expect the following disasters in short order: a Chinese invasion, the collapse of Taiwan's computer industry, and the return of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek from beyond the grave as a Quran-quoting jihad warrior. And probably a couple of nasty typhoons, to boot.

As one regular observer of Taiwan affairs noted, "reaction, informally, in U.S.-Taiwan circles to the surprise announcement of Paul Wolfowitz as chairman of the US-Taiwan Business Council has been, to be frank, incredulous."

What were they thinking?

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Andrew Leonard

Andrew Leonard is a staff writer at Salon. On Twitter, @koxinga21.

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Globalization How The World Works Iraq War

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