Lena Dunham (AP/Danny Moloshok)

5 times "Girls" creator Lena Dunham took a stand

On Tuesday, she called on New Yorkers to help "get rid of the guns" in subway ads for "Jason Bourne"


Scott Eric Kaufman
July 13, 2016 9:40PM (UTC)

On Tuesday, "Girls" creator Lena Dunham promoted an idea first floated by producer Tami Sagher -- to remove all the guns from ads on the New York subway system for the new Matt Damon film "Jason Bourne." Sagher posted the following on Instagram:

Dunham agreed enthusiastically, calling it a "good idea" and urging her follows to get on it.

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This is not, however, the first time Dunham has taken a stand:

1. She rallied behind Kesha after a Manhattan Supreme Court judge refused to cancel her contract with the producer Kesha accused of raping her

"Kesha says that for ten years Gottwald drugged, raped, and emotionally abused her and controlled her creatively and emotionally through threats and manipulations," Dunham wrote. "What’s happening to Kesha highlights the way that the American legal system continues to hurt women by failing to protect them from the men they identify as their abusers."

2. She defended Jennifer Lawrence for speaking out about the wage gap in Hollywood

“‘I’m sick of trying to find the adorable way to say something’ is such a relatable statement. It’s so painful when I look back and think about all the moments that I minced words because of the fact that I didn’t want to be perceived as a bitch, a diva, or an a–hole," she said. "If Jennifer Lawrence has dealt with it, just imagine what the negotiating process is like for a female actor who doesn’t have her level of leverage."

3. She attacked the editorial cruelty of publications like Gawker and Jezebel

“I used to read Gawker and Jezebel in college and be like, ‘I can’t wait to get to New York where my people will be to welcome me,’" she said. "And it’s like, it’s literally, if I read it, it’s like going back to a husband who beat me in the face — it just doesn’t make any sense.”

4. She temporarily quit Twitter in 2015 to protest the social media site's refusal to do anything about its culture of trolling

"I deleted Twitter because I’m trying to create a safer space for myself emotionally," she said. "People like, threaten my life and tell me what a cow I am. So I decided I was gonna quit. I check it occasionally, but it isn’t the same co-dependence Twitter and I once shared. It’s the dark side of the internet."

5. She defended Taylor Swift after Kanye West included a nude wax lookalike of her in an art installation

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"I don’t have a hip cool reaction," she wrote on Facebook, "because seeing a woman I love like Taylor Swift (f__k that one hurt to look at, I couldn’t look), a woman I admire like Rihanna or Anna, reduced to a pair of waxy breasts made by some special effects guy in the Valley, it makes me feel sad and unsafe and worried for the teenage girls who watch this and may not understand that grainy roving camera as the stuff of snuff films."


Scott Eric Kaufman

Scott Eric Kaufman is an assistant editor at Salon. He taught at a university, but then thought better of it. Follow him at @scottekaufman or email him at skaufman@salon.com.

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Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Action Films Gawker Gun Control Jason Bourne Lena Dunham Matt Damn

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