Anthony Scaramucci (AP/Alex Brandon)

Stephen Colbert snags the Mooch for a "Late Show" interview

The host announced via Twitter that White House exile Anthony Scaramucci will appear on "The Late Show"


Gabriel Bell
August 10, 2017 2:32PM (UTC)

Hold on to whatever's bolted to the ground, because the Mooch is back and he's coming at you through the TV. Yesterday, "Late Show" host Stephen Colbert announced via his Twitter account that former incoming White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci would be appearing on the CBS show in one of his first interviews since being bounced off the concrete by new chief of staff, Gen. John Kelly.

According to Colbert, Scaramucci — who flamed out of his position at the executive branch in a mere 10 days — will appear on the "Late Show" this coming Monday, August 14.

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The Mooch, who went nearly silent after being forced to resign July 31, will also be interviewed by George Stephanopoulos on ABC's "This Week" this coming Sunday.

The interviews mark a second phase in the boisterous slickster's return to the public eye. Already Scaramucci — who lost not only his business, but his marriage through his association with the Trump administration — had planned and then cancelled a press event for August 3.

More successfully, he has returned to tweeting with a vengeance, dragging New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza — he of the famously obscene Scaramucci interview — all over the social-media platform.

In the July 27 article in question, Lizza writes that he not only received permission from Scaramucci to record the conversation, but repeatedly reminded him that he was on the record when the incoming White House communications director veered into more bumpy territory.

Scaramucci has also continued to stand up for his former boss, despite the fact that his former boss has not stood up for him.

For his part, former White House press secretary Sean Spicer — the man who Scaramucci was supposed to replace but who actually technically outlasted him in the Trump administration — is also attempting to come out of his shell. On top of meeting with various networks about various positions, recent reports suggest that he has been “angling” to appear on "Saturday Night Live," the show that helped turn him into an international laughingstock. He also remains the saddest person in the United States.

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Gabriel Bell

Gabriel Bell is Salon's Deputy Culture Editor. Follow him on Twitter at @GabrielJBell

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