U.S. officials alarmed as white supremacists cite Taliban as model for domestic warfare

Far-right extremist groups have reportedly been "invigorated" by recent news reports out of Afghanistan

By Sarah Burris
Published September 2, 2021 4:30AM (EDT)
Afghan Taliban militants and villagers attend a gathering as they celebrate the peace deal and their victory in the Afghan conflict on US in Afghanistan, in Alingar district of Laghman Province on March 2, 2020. - The Taliban said on March 2 they were resuming offensive operations against Afghan security forces, ending the partial truce that preceded the signing of a deal between the insurgents and Washington. (NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP via Getty Images)
Afghan Taliban militants and villagers attend a gathering as they celebrate the peace deal and their victory in the Afghan conflict on US in Afghanistan, in Alingar district of Laghman Province on March 2, 2020. - The Taliban said on March 2 they were resuming offensive operations against Afghan security forces, ending the partial truce that preceded the signing of a deal between the insurgents and Washington. (NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP via Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on Raw Story

rawlogo

A CNN report Wednesday noted that the embrace of the Taliban by some white supremacists and anti-government extremists is causing concern among American officials.

The championing of the Taliban by the U.S. groups comes at a time that Afghan allies are coming to the United States as refugees for their own safety.

The report details trends from the groups that have been "framing the activities of the Taliban as a success," and saying that it could be a model for their efforts to create a civil war in the U.S.

Department of Homeland Security's Office of Intelligence and Analysis chief John Cohen cited the "great replacement" conspiracy theory that has been promoted recently by Fox News host Tucker Carlson as fuel for these white supremacists.

"So we're getting it and if history is any guide—and it's always a guide —we will see many refugees from Afghanistan resettle in our country in coming months, probably in your neighborhood," Carlson said during a recent broadcast. "And over the next decade, that number may swell to the millions. So first we invade, and then we're invaded. It is always the same."

"There are concerns that those narratives may incite violent activities directed at immigrant communities, certain faith communities, or even those who are relocated to the United States," said Cohen.

A recent analysis from SITE Intelligence Group said that far-right extremist groups have been "invigorated" by Afghanistan. Either they want to emulate the Taliban or they want to fight back against "invasions" by the refugees.

"These farmers and minimally trained men fought to take back their nation back from globohomo. They took back their government, installed their national religion as law, and executed dissenters ... If white men in the west had the same courage as the Taliban, we would not be ruled by Jews currently," read one post from a fascist Proud Boys Telegram group that SITE found.

Read the full report from CNN.com.


Sarah Burris

MORE FROM Sarah Burris