House passes $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill — a major victory for Biden's agenda

The funding package passed 228 to 206, with 13 Republicans pulling the bill across the finish line

By John Wright

Published November 6, 2021 1:40AM (EDT)

U.S. President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the East Room of the White House August 16, 2021 in Washington, DC. Biden cut his vacation in Camp David short to address the nation as the Taliban have seized control in Afghanistan two weeks before the U.S. is set to complete its troop withdrawal after a costly two-decade war. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)
U.S. President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the East Room of the White House August 16, 2021 in Washington, DC. Biden cut his vacation in Camp David short to address the nation as the Taliban have seized control in Afghanistan two weeks before the U.S. is set to complete its troop withdrawal after a costly two-decade war. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on Raw Story

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The House late Friday approved a roughly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill in a major victory for President Joe Biden's agenda.

The bill, which has already been approved by the Senate, now heads to Biden's desk.

"The funding package, which passed 228 to 206 and relied on Republican votes to get across the finish line, will ramp up government spending on roads, bridges and airports, as well as funding for public transit, water and broadband," NBC News reports. "The vote hands Biden a victory on a major bipartisan bill, but one that took months to get through Congress and revealed deep divisions in the Democratic Party."


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The bill had been held up since August — when it passed the Senate by a 69-30 vote.

"Democrats had wanted to pass the infrastructure bill and a social spending bill at the same time," Scripps reports. "However, moderates and progressives spent months going back and forth over the price and scope of the bill, known as the Build Back Better Act. The two wings of the Democratic party said they entered into a commitment to vote on the Build Back Better Act no later than Nov. 15, which will provide enough time for the Congressional Budget Office enough time to score the bill."


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