This incredibly smart domestic violence app could save women’s lives

The Aspire News app looks like a generic news app, but it's actually a potentially lifesaving alert system

Topics: domestic violence, women, Women's Rights, Violence Against Women, abuse, Apps, , ,

This incredibly smart domestic violence app could save women's lives (Credit: Aspire News)

The Aspire News app looks like any other iPhone or Android news aggregator, but it’s actually a potentially lifesaving domestic violence alert system.

While the front page functions like a regular news app, when you go to the “Help” section of the page it provides a list of local domestic violence resources and a “Go Button,” that, once pressed, alerts the user’s chosen contacts, local authorities and service providers about the violent or potentially violent situation.

From the creators:

If someone you know is in an abusive relationship — or if that someone is you — the Help Section of the application contains complete resources for victims of domestic violence, as well as a way to get help when you need it.

This app does not serve as a replacement for emergency services — in any situation where you feel that you may be at risk, please dial 911 or your local emergency number.



It’s a simple idea, but a potentially lifesaving one. People in situations of abuse often have their phone and online activity monitored by their abusers, so having an app that can help someone get help without the abuser’s notice could serve as a lifeline for someone in danger. And best of all, it’s completely free.

h/t A Look into the Mind of Mia via Jezebel

 

Katie McDonough is Salon's politics writer, focusing on gender, sexuality and reproductive justice. Follow her on Twitter @kmcdonovgh or email her at kmcdonough@salon.com.

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