Is Amazon ruining dating in Seattle?

The company's rapid expansion has brought severe gender imbalance to the city -- and things are only getting worse

Topics: the daily dot, amazon, dating, Amazon.com, ,

Is Amazon ruining dating in Seattle?
This article originally appeared on The Daily Dot. It has been corrected since it first published.

The Daily Dot

Tech consultant/writer and Seattle native Jeff Reifman is having a hard time finding a date in his city. But unlike most men, who might blame their romantic travails on being overweight or living with their parents or women being selfish shallow bitches who just can’t appreciate Nice Guys, Reifman believes his dating woes come from a less expected sourceAmazon.com.

In a blog post titled “You’ve Got Male: Amazon’s Growth Impacting Seattle’s Dating Scene,” Reifman says that the retail conglomerate’s rapid expansion—Amazon’s Seattle workforce has increased nearly fivefold over the past few years, with its number of Seattle employees up from 5,000 to 25,000 since 2010—has affected his ability to get a date. Approximately 75 percent of Amazon’s workforce is male, and Reifman argues that there simply aren’t enough available single women in the city to go around:

Over the past two years, I’ve personally found dating in Seattle has become increasingly difficult. It’s less common to meet single women in person and online dating is more difficult. It’s not that I can’t get dates but it’s harder to find women that are a good match for me. Online, it’s been harder to catch women’s attention, harder to get them to schedule a date and they cancel dates more frequently. When we do meet in person, it’s been harder to capture their interest and nearly impossible to find one interested in a relationship. The women here seem more distracted than ever before and at times, I’ve felt like a number to them.

You Might Also Like

So Reifman did what any sexually frustrated single male would do: He crunched the numbers, comparing estimates of Amazon’s expansion to census data in Seattle. What he found was a significant gender imbalance between eligible single men in Seattle and eligible women, weighing heavily in women’s favor: By the end of 2014, he projects, there’ll be 130 single men for every 100 single women, an estimate that’s up from a ratio of 119 single men to 100 single women in April 2010. In short: Amazon has turned Seattle into one big sausage fest.

Of course, it’s not all that surprising that there would be more single men that women in a city experiencing enormous tech growth. There are similar gender imbalances in Silicon Valley, for instance, to the point where the dating startup Dating Ring is arranging for single women in New York City to fly out to the Bay Area to meet single men. But as jarring as Reifman’s habit of number-crunching to explain why he’s not getting laid may be, it’s probably reassuring for men in the Seattle tech community to hear that their romantic troubles are not due to any fault of their own, but to a good old-fashioned gender disparity.

Short of the Dating Ring’s proposal to fly out eligible women to Silicon Valley (which, when it was announced earlier this year, was unfavorably compared to the Japanese Imperial Army’s practice of providing “comfort women” to World War II soldiers), there doesn’t seem to be a solution in sight to the tech community’s gender imbalance. (Except for, you know, hiring more women in tech, but of course that’s out of the question, because they might have their periods all over potential investors.) But for single women, there’s obviously a silver lining to this cloud. Ladies, if you’re having trouble navigating the East Coast dating scene, take a trip to the City of Flowers. Reifman and his buddies will welcome you with open arms (and smiling peens).

More Related Stories

Featured Slide Shows

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • 1 of 11
  • Close
  • Fullscreen
  • Thumbnails
    Martyna Blaszczyk/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 1

    Pond de l'Archeveche - hundreds thousands of padlocks locked to a bridge by random couples, as a symbol of their eternal love. After another iconic Pont des Arts bridge was cleared of the padlocks in 2010 (as a safety measure), people started to place their love symbols on this one. Today both of the bridges are full of love locks again.

    Anders Andersson/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 2

    A bird's view of tulip fields near Voorhout in the Netherlands, photographed with a drone in April 2015.

    Aashit Desai/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 3

    Angalamman Festival is celebrated every year in a small town called Kaveripattinam in Tamil Nadu. Devotees, numbering in tens of thousands, converge in this town the day after Maha Shivratri to worship the deity Angalamman, meaning 'The Guardian God'. During the festival some of the worshippers paint their faces that personifies Goddess Kali. Other indulge in the ritual of piercing iron rods throughout their cheeks.

    Allan Gichigi/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 4

    Kit Mikai is a natural rock formation about 40m high found in Western Kenya. She goes up the rocks regularly to meditate. Kit Mikai, Kenya

    Chris Ludlow/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 5

    On a weekend trip to buffalo from Toronto we made a pit stop at Niagara Falls on the Canadian side. I took this shot with my nexus 5 smartphone. I was randomly shooting the falls themselves from different viewpoints when I happened to get a pretty lucky and interesting shot of this lone seagull on patrol over the falls. I didn't even realize I had captured it in the shot until I went back through the photos a few days later

    Jassen T./National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 6

    Incredibly beautiful and extremely remote. Koehn Lake, Mojave Desert, California. Aerial Image.

    Howard Singleton/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 7

    Lucky timing! The oxpecker was originally sitting on hippo's head. I could see the hippo was going into a huge yawn (threat display?) and the oxpecker had to vacate it's perch. When I snapped the pic, the oxpecker appeared on the verge of being inhaled and was perfectly positioned between the massive gaping jaws of the hippo. The oxpecker also appears to be screeching in terror and back-pedaling to avoid being a snack!

    Abrar Mohsin/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 8

    The Yetis of Nepal - The Aghoris as they are called are marked by colorful body paint and clothes

    Madeline Crowley/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 9

    Taken from a zodiac raft on a painfully cold, rainy day

    Ian Bird/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

    National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest Entries

    Slide 10

    This wave is situated right near the CBD of Sydney. Some describe it as the most dangerous wave in Australia, due to it breaking on barnacle covered rocks only a few feet deep and only ten metres from the cliff face. If you fall off you could find yourself in a life and death situation. This photo was taken 300 feet directly above the wave from a helicopter, just as the surfer is pulling into the lip of the barrel.

  • Recent Slide Shows

Comments

Loading Comments...