Salon recommends

An erotica maven's frank take on getting published, a hilarious anti-boomer diatribe and more.


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Salon Staff
June 18, 2001 11:45PM (UTC)

What we're reading, what we're liking

How to Read/Write a Dirty Story by Susie Bright
Actually, I have no desire to write erotica (but if I did, this manual by the famous sexpert -- and Salon alumnus -- Susie Bright would undoubtedly be the guide I'd select). What I immediately zoomed to in this e-published book is Bright's chapter on the publishing industry, which begins with an impassioned argument for not publishing at all. The rest of the chapter details the nitty, gritty and not very pretty realities of an author's life, with frank assessments of what writers can expect when working with big publishers, small publishers and agents. Every would-be and burgeoning author should read it -- especially the ones who believe that publishing a book will transform them into august people-of-letters, make them scads of money, attract any attention at all and/or not break their hearts. The book can be ordered here.

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-- Laura Miller

Balsamic Dreams by Joe Queenan
When it comes to clean humor, nothing beats generational warfare. So I've been enjoying poking around in Joe Queenan's "Balsamic Dreams," a hilarious, quasi-maniacal extended rant against the baby boomers. You'd think Queenan's own membership in that much-maligned demographic would make him soften his critique, but he pulls no punches -- proving that at least some boomers are capable of self-criticism. Then again, one of his points is that to some degree, we're all boomers now, since they've effectively infiltrated every aspect of American life with their self-righteous philosophy of endless options and no real consequences.

-- Maria Russo

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