Corrections


September 20, 2011 9:12PM (UTC)

Salon strives to publish accurate information at all times. Minor errors of spelling, punctuation and the like will be corrected on our website without notice. When we correct significant errors of fact or substance, we will note the correction here and also on the page containing the corrected version of the original article. If you think Salon has published something in error, please email readermail@salon.com.

2018 Corrections

A September 1 article, "We don't need to "rethink college" — we need to rethink the arguments against it," identified the wrong author of the book "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom. The story has been corrected.

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A July 11 article, "U2 isn't radical now: On tour, Bono calls for justice too softly — and safely — for 2018," attributed a referenced song about Martin Luther King Jr. to the wrong album. The story has been corrected.

A source for a July 10 article, "Why one crew member quit the anti-abortion "Roe V. Wade" film, featuring Jon Voight and Stacey Dash," mistakenly referred to a crew member on a film as the Unit Production Manager. The crew member in question is the line producer. The story has been corrected.

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A May 7 article, "#MenToo: Are guys the real victims of sexism?" has been further edited since its original publication. Attorney Alfred Rava's relationship with the National Coalition of Men, and we have included Rava's statement that he has held no official position with that group in recent years. A later quotation from Rava concerning the organization has been deleted. As originally published, the article reported that Rava and Rich Allison had sued the city of San Diego over a "girls' empowerment camp." In fact, they only made a complaint and did not file a lawsuit. Salon regrets the error.

A March 26 article, "Chris Cuomo grills Rick Santorum on the hypocrisy of evangelicals," identified Rick Santorum as an evangelical Christian. He is a Roman Catholic.

A March 21 article, "Thousands of Republicans voted for an Illinois Nazi," may have miscounted the number of Republicans who cast a vote for Arthur Jones.

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In the Feb. 26 article, "Madam C.J. Walker wasn't the first African American millionaire," the date of death for Walker was erroneously attributed to 1917. Madam C.J. Walker died in 1919. The same article misstated a source's calculation of the value of Walker's assets at the time of her death, and has been corrected. Salon regrets these errors. 

In an interview published on Feb. 10, author Bill Mares said that Bernie Sanders "refused to support the assault weapons ban." Politifact reports that Sanders has supported, and voted for, various measures to ban assault weapons since 1993. This clarification has been added to the story.

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A Feb. 7 story, "Here’s what the critics are saying about 'Black Panther' — it’s a 'masterpiece,'" said that Black Panther was "the first blockbuster-format release featuring a black hero front and center." We recognize that other black actors have led blockbuster films. We have corrected it to read that "Black Panther" is centered on an iconic black comic book figure, and features a predominantly black cast and has a director and black writers, and is being distributed to a wide audience

2017 Corrections

A Dec. 20 article, "Did the Wall Street Journal kill an editorial exposing Trump’s mob dealings?" wrote in error that several former Wall Street Journal contributors had been laid off by the publication. Salon regrets the error.

A Dec. 4 article, "Bill O’Reilly faces another lawsuit from woman he allegedly abused," wrote that Rachel Witlieb Bernstein accused the former Fox News host of sexual harasmsent. Her harassment case did not include sexual harassment allegations.

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In a Nov. 30 article, "Russell Simmons leaves companies following disturbing rape allegation," the original headline and introductory text said that Simmons was leaving Def Jam Recordings. He sold his interests in 1996, but still retained ownership of the logo and other branding elements. He is, in fact, stepping down from his role in all his other enterprises.

In a Nov. 1 article, "Alex Jones: The Russia investigation is a plot to make Robert Mueller 'the first King of America,'" Salon wrote: Alex Jones tweeted images of an ad for the revolution that he alleges appeared in the New York Times (it did not).” This is an error. The advertisement was published in the New York Times. This mistake was introduced in the editing process and is misleading. The text of the story has been revised and clarified.

An Oct. 22 article, "Don't judge a building by its walls: Architecture is about space, and how it feels," incorrectly referred to I. M. Pei as a Japanese architect. The story has been corrected.

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An Oct. 10 article, "A college professor criticized Trump. Now the White House wants an investigation," incorrectly referred to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, as the "University of Las Vegas." The story has been corrected.

A Sept. 27 article, "The souls of black folk: Georgia executes man convicted by a racist juror," incorrectly reported Keith Leroy Tharpe was executed; he was granted a last-minute stay of execution by the U.S. Supreme Court. Both the story and headline have been corrected.

A Sept. 29 article, "Can Jared Kushner follow instructions?" reported that Jared Kushner listed himself as a woman on a voter registration form. Later reporting revealed the error was not on his part, but on the part of the New York Board of elections.

A Sept. 25 article, "I think Ivanka is much better-looking than her": 15 hours of Donald Trump with Howard Stern," misidentified what pageant was owned by Donald Trump. It was the Miss USA pageant, not the Miss America pageant.

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A Sept. 4 article, "Subsidizing massive tech companies isn't paying off for workers," incorrectly listed the amount of the tax break Apple received for opening a data center in Waukee, Iowa. This has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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An Aug. 17 article, "Trump supporters set to march alongside Juggalos in D.C.," incorrectly identified two groups associated with MOAR as also being involved in the white-supremacist movement. This has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

An Aug. 15 article, "Baltimore votes to get rid of its four Confederate statues," reported that Copperhead Democrats opposed secession and clashed with Confederate sympathizers. In fact, the anti-war Copperheads joined Confederate sympathizers in clashing with Union militias, drawing the first blood of the Civil War. Salon regrets the error.

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A June 17 article "The 10 best father (mostly bad) and son films," incorrectly identified the actor in “I Never Sang for My Father portraying Tom Garrison as Jim Broadbent. The story has been updated to reflect the correct actor's name: Melvyn Douglas. Salon regrets the error.

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A June 7 partner piece from Alternet, "Why Gal Gadot Is a Real-Life Wonder Woman," initially incorrectly indicated that the heroine of "Wonder Woman" vanquishes many Nazis. The story has been corrected to state that Wonder Woman defeats German soldiers.

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In the March 16  story “Bad boy gone worse,” Salon incorrectly reported that Gavin McInnes had said that domestic violence was a lie. That inaccurate paraphrase has been replaced with a direct quotation from McInnes' Twitter feed of Dec. 20, 2016.

Salon also incorrectly reported that McInnes had said Neil deGrasse Tyson could not really be an astrophysicist. A similar comment about Tyson was stated by another participant in a Fox News discussion that included McInnes. The paraphrase that was mistakenly attributed to McInnes has been deleted. Salon regrets the errors.  

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The subhead of a May 9 story "Trump's social media director threatens to release Hillary Clinton's election night concession call" incorrectly said the social media director for President Donald Trump's administration wants to make public a voicemail from Hillary Clinton conceding the presidential election to Trump. But he has claimed instead that he wishes to release a video recording of a Clinton phone call. The subheading has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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An  April 27 story "Scott Walker stands by David Clarke, even after 4 inmates died in Milwaukee jails in 6 months" incorrectly attributed a statement to a spokeswoman for Gov. Scott Walker though a Sheriff David Clarke spokesman actually provided it. The story has been updated; Salon regrets the error.

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A March 30 story, “GMO” isn’t a dirty word: Genetically modified insects could save lives, but first humans have to be convinced" incorrectly characterized an effort to eradicate Lyme disease in Nantucket, Massachusetts. It is not related to a gene drive technique being studied. Instead it involves editing the genes of mice (not of ticks) so they are pathogen resistant. The story has been updated; Salon regrets the error.

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A March 29 story "Anti-abortion activist filmmakers charged with 15 felonies" had incorrectly stated that David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt had been convicted on felony counts. The story has been corrected to reflect that the two have been indicted on 15 felony counts. Salon regrets the error.

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A March 26 story about Ivanka Trump and an upcoming honor for Chelsea Clinton incorrectly referred to the distinction being bestowed and the organization granting it. Chelsea Clinton will be an honoree at Variety magazine’s Power of Women: New York event next month. The story has been updated; Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the March 24 story "Guess who Fortune left off its “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” list?" incorrectly referred to Forbes in multiple cases instead of Fortune. The article has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the March 18 story "Real Estate returns in new form, with new sound" incorrectly cited the name of a new album. Real Estate's fourth album is titled "In Mind" not "In Time." The story has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Feb. 10 story "Trump's alleged computer server connection with a Russian bank continues to be investigated" incorrectly stated that Spectrum Health is a medical facility chain owned by the husband of Trump's education secretary, Betsy DeVos. The story has been corrected to indicate that DeVos' husband, Dick DeVos, serves as chairman of the board for Spectrum Health. The article has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Feb. 3 story "David Bowie's "Earthling" is 20 years old today" incorrectly stated that David Bowie self-produced the album and that he celebrated his 50th birthday with acts such as The Cure and Smashing Pumpkins. The story has been corrected to state that the album was co-produced by Bowie and that he celebrated his birthday with acts such as The Cure's Robert Smith and Smashing Pumpkins' Billy Corgan. The story has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Feb. 3 story "Bowling Green massacre": Kellyanne Conway, Rand Paul fabricate attack to defend Muslim ban" paraphrased an article from Vox without properly attributing the author or the source. The paraphrasing has been replaced with a direct quotation from the story, and a link has been added. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 31 story "Forget impeachment: Donald Trump can be driven from office, but probably not that way" incorrectly cited the number of seats Democrats would have to gain in the 2018 midterms to realize an effective majority of each chamber of Congress. The story has been updated to say the Democrats would need to pick up a net of three seats in the Senate and on the House side 25 seats. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 24 story "Don’t look now: It’s President Pence! Donald Trump can be deposed, even without impeachment" previously indicated that the 25th Amendment's Article 4 has been invoked three times. The article has been updated to indicate that a temporary transfer of presidential power has taken place a handful of times.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 22 story “Pirates in the desert: Oakland Raiders charging toward biggest taxpayer subsidy in NFL history” had referred to the U.S. Bank Stadium as the future home of the Minnesota Vikings, but the stadium opened in August 2016. The story has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 19 story "Netflix gets its groove back as it prepares to unleash major talent in 2017" had referred to Jerry Seinfeld as a billionaire. The story has been updated to note he is a multimillionaire. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 11 story "Donald Trump isn't going to admit just how unpopular he is" had initially referenced a tweet that appeared to have come from Donald Trump's official Twitter account. This tweet did not come from the president-elect's account and has been removed from this story. Salon regrets the error.

2016 Corrections

An earlier version of the Dec. 4 story  "Want to win the working-class vote? Try progressive economic policies, Democrats” previously indicated that Alvin Greene ran for an open South Carolina Senate seat in 2010 and  was trounced by Nikki Haley, later the state’s governor. The article has been corrected to say that Alvin Green ran against Jim DeMint in 2010 and lost the race by more than 30 points. Salon regrets the error.

An earlier version of the Nov. 17 story "Donald Trump’s Supreme Court will be a real threat to labor — and that’s going to hurt the Democrats" had inaccurately suggested there may be serious court challenges to state and local minimum wage laws.  The story has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 13 story "Here’s how the Fed’s rate hike will affect your credit card interest payments" quoted an annual household debt study by NerdWallet that contained an inaccurate calculation related to credit card debt and interest rates and the latest Federal Reserve rate adjustment. The report, and the story, have been updated.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 22 story "The new 'Inconvenient Truth': Leonardo DiCaprio's new documentary wants to challenge climate change skeptics" referred to the film by the wrong title. The documentary is "Before the Flood." Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 14 story "Rise of the sane and angry woman: 'Girl on the Train' is the 2016 rejoinder to 'Fatal Attraction'" mistakenly attributed a role played by Justin Theroux to Luke Evans. This story has been updated.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 5 story "BULLSH**TER OF THE DAY: Monica Crowley, for tweeting about walls" mistakenly dated Monica Crowley's quote Oct. 5, 2016. Her comment was actually made on October 5, 2015. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Sept. 24 story "No, Jennifer Lawrence isn't playing 'Mulan' — but that rumor won't die for good reason" mistakenly attributed a film role by Mickey Rooney to Andy Rooney. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Sept. 5 story "The Oscars might not be #SoWhite in 2017: These buzz-worthy performances could be game-changers" contained errors in Oscar nomination counts for black actresses. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Aug. 30 story "Willy Wonka deserved an Oscar: A close look at Gene Wilder's finest role" originally stated that Wilder won an Academy Award for the screenplay of "Young Frankenstein," when it was Mel Brooks who won for the script, though Wilder conceived of the story. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the June 11 story "Donald Trump echoes Charles Lindbergh: The history of his odious campaign slogan," first published by our partner site The Conversation, mis-identified Charles Coughlin as an America First board member. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the June 7 story "Craig Finn looks back on The Hold Steady's 'Boys and Girls in America': 'Maybe it was the end of something'" reported that the band would play a reunion tour this year; the band will play two festival performances only in support of the album's anniversary. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 6 story "Muhammad Ali's hometown heartbreak: I went looking for Ali's Louisville and it wasn't there" mistakenly dated a Sports Illustrated interview given by Ali at 1961. The correct year is 1976. The story has been corrected.

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An earlier version of the May 26 story "Donald Trump, the ultimate 'Survivor': How watching Richard Hatch win laid the groundwork for Trump the GOP nominee" mistakenly attributed a hypothetical head-to-head poll between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to Pew Research Center, when creators actually performed calculations using Pew data. The story has been corrected.

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The May 21 story "This is how the strongman wins: Donald Trump's single greatest weapon is America's hatred for its press," first published by our partner site, BillMoyers.com, incorrectly stated that John Kasich was the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating. Bernie Sanders enjoyed a net favorability rating at the time of polling as well. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 20 story "Donald Trump is doing to the GOP exactly what he did to the USFL," first published by our partner site, ProPublica, misidentified Donald Trump as the original owner of the New Jersey Generals. He purchased the team in 1983. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the May 7 story "The triumphs & tribulations of a 'pragmatic' progressive governor: Inside the world of Dannel Malloy" misspelled Governor Malloy's name in the headline. Salon regrets this error.

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The April 20 story "The misery of TurboTax capitalism: How private companies give big government a bad rep" incorrectly listed Grover Norquist as the president of the Club for Growth. In reality, Norquist is the president of Americans for Tax Reform. Salon regrets this error.

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Due to an editing error, the April 8 story "From Siri to sexbots: Female AI reinforces a toxic desire for passive, agreeable and easily dominated women" was published without a citation for communication scholar Lana Rakow's work on telephone operators. The story has been updated. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 7 story "This is the problem with Bernie's revolution: How one down-ticket election in Wisconsin shows the flaw in his political movement" incorrectly suggested that the names on the ballot for the Wisconsin Supreme Court election held the prior Tuesday were arranged in alphabetical order. In reality, the ordering was determined at random, and Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg's name appeared first. The story has been corrected.

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The March 29 story "Why Ted Cruz's sex life matters: The GOP's toxic 'family values' charade deserves continued scrutiny" erroneously referred to former Rep. Barney Frank as a retired senator. The story has been corrected.

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The March 21 story originally titled “Behind the music on ‘Vinyl’: This is why David Bowie cover bands are so rare” has been update to reflect the origin of the version of David Bowie's “Suffragette City” heard in the episode.

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The March 20 story "'Music is so abused these days': XTC's Andy Partridge opens up about songwriting, painting and developing the 'cruel parent gene' toward your own art" misidentified Partridge's Monkees song "You Bring The Summer" as "You Bring The Sun." The story has been corrected.

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The March 18 story "Don't rewrite LGBT history: If we erase the truths of our past struggles, we're doomed to repeat them" originally stated that Harvey Milk was the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in the U.S. Milk was the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in California. The story has been corrected.

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The Feb. 29 story "Behind the music on 'Vinyl': Did you spot Joey Ramone on last night's episode?" misidentified the Raspberries' producer Jimmy Ienner as Jimmy Iovine. The story has been corrected.

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The Feb. 24 story "Eric Holder gets real about heroin and race: It's a crisis because white people are hooked" misidentified former senior White House advisor on drug policy Keith Humphreys as "drug czar." The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 9 story "White woman walks ahead: Jessica Chastain starring in a film about Sitting Bull is everything that's wrong with prestige films" originally stated that no Native actors had ever been nominated for acting Academy Awards. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 5 story "Cam Newton is becoming the face of the NFL" originally stated that Russell Wilson of the Seahawks was the first black quarterback to win a Super Bowl. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 28 story "Abolish the Oscars -- or just let them fade away? Danny Glover and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar tackle a fading institution" incorrectly stated that Jennifer Jason Leigh was the only Jewish actor nominated for an Oscar in the last two years. That sentence has been removed.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 26 article "The GOP's new anti-deficit crusade is deeply cynical & misleading even by their low standards" incorrectly stated that a simple accounting tweak could decrease the federal budget deficit for the fiscal year beginning on Oct. 1, 2016, by 40 percent. In reality, the tweak would reduce the year-over-year increase in the federal deficit by 40 percent. The story has been corrected.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 25 article "British film industry fails on race, too: Tone-deaf remarks from Charlotte Rampling and Michael Caine are symptoms of deeper problems" incorrectly stated that Dorothy Dandridge was not nominated for a BAFTA for her role in "Carmen Jones," when she was. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 13 article "David Bowie, Elvis and 'Blade Runner': A fan theory to end all fan theories" incorrectly stated the Elvis Presley movie originally titled "Black Star" was not released; it was released as "Flaming Star." The story has been corrected.

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An earlier version of the headline of the Jan. 6 article on "American Crime" season 2 incorrectly referred to the victim of the sexual assault as an athlete. The headline has been updated.

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An earlier version of the Jan. 1 article "5 excellent crowd-pleasing movies you might have missed in 2015" incorrectly stated that Maggie Smith starred in "Snowpiercer." The correct actress is Tilda Swinton. The story has been updated.

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2015 Corrections

An earlier version of the Dec. 18 article "True crime, Netflix-style: Because you watched 'The Jinx,' here's 'Making a Murderer'" did not mention that the review was based on the first two episodes of the show, not the entire 10. The story has been updated to clarify.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 17 article "Trent Reznor was robbed: Nine Inch Nails’ Rock Hall snub proves electronic music still doesn't get respect" incorrectly stated that Nile Rodger plays bass; he plays guitar. The story has been updated.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 16 article "The truth about Serena & American Pharaoh: Here’s the real reason why the comparison is so insulting" incorrectly stated that Serena Williams finished just shy of winning a Career Grand Slam in 2015. In truth, she finished just shy of winning a Calendar Grand Slam. Salon regrets this error.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 8 article "As Maine goes, so goes the nation: Will this small city's mayoral election predict a Trump victory in 2016?" incorrectly referred to Bates College as the most expensive college in the country. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 6 article "The best comics of 2015: With Islamophobia rearing its ugly head, we need 'Ms. Marvel' now more than ever" incorrectly referred to the Image comics title "We Stand On Guard" as "We Make Our Stand." The story has been updated.

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An earlier version of the Dec. 2 article "Mutiny at 'The Daily Show': Chris Brown bait-and-switch casts doubt on Trevor Noah's hosting chops" incorrectly referred to Chris Brown as a rapper. He is a hip-hop and R&B performer. The story has been updated.

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The Nov. 30 story "When 'The Office' is Wal-Mart: 'Superstore' tackles workplace comedy with an eye on the minimum wage" misidentified actress America Ferrera as Mexican-American. Ferrera is in fact Honduran-American. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Nov. 17 article "The GOP's devious Wall Street welfare plan: Why the future of the economy hangs in the balance" incorrectly said that Congressman David Scott's given name was "Bobby." Salon regrets this error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 28 story "Wil Wheaton is right: Stop expecting artists to work for free — or worse, for 'exposure'" incorrectly stated that Wheaton once starred in "Star Trek: A New Generation" when in fact the name of the classic series is "Star Trek: The Next Generation." Salon deeply regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 26 story "Ben Carson's horrifying Iowa surge: Why his campaign's rapid rise bodes ill for this election" incorrectly stated that Ted Cruz signed up for a policy through Obamacare. In reality, he publicly considered such a move but ultimately did not, according to a Washington Post report.

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The Oct. 25 story "Veterans for Bernie Sanders: Why the anti-war candidate is so beloved by former soldiers," first published by our partner site, AlterNet, misidentified Sanders as a pacifist in an earlier headline. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 20 story "Now white people are trying to ruin 'Star Wars': Racist reaction to new trailer is part Gamergate, part Donald Trump" incorrectly identified actor John Boyega as "Danny Boyega." Salon regrets this error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 19 story "We were promised hoverboards: Of course 'Back to the Future II' got 2015 mostly wrong — here's why" incorrectly attributed a video on "Back to the Future II" to Funny or Die. The video in question was produced by College Humor. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 14 story "Last night's most important lesson: The GOP's longstanding myth about Democrats is starting to crumble" incorrectly stated that CNN's Democratic primary debate on Oct. 13 achieved a higher rating than CNN's Republican primary debate from the prior month. While it was the highest rated Democratic debate ever, the Republican debate nonetheless had a higher viewership. The story has been updated to reflect this.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 13 story "The 5 trolliest moments from Quentin Tarantino’s new interview with Bret Easton Ellis” said that Tarantino’s film “Django Unchained” lost out to “Zero Dark Thirty” at the 2010 Oscars. It was actually his film “Inglourious Basterds” that lost to "The Hurt Locker." Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Oct. 11 story "We get it, you love the '80s! John Hughes nostalgia trap catches 'Red Oaks'" stated that "Red Oaks" is a show is created entirely by men. It is not. The show has two female writers, and one of them, Karey Dornetto, is also a co-executive producer. The piece has been updated to reflect that.

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The Oct. 5 story "5 worst right-wing moments of the week -- Sean Hannity is never more loathsome than after a gun massacre" originally identified Rep. Glen Grothman as a congressman from Minnesota. He is, in fact, from Wisconsin. Salon regrets the error.

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The Oct. 3 story "''SNL' is still the center of his universe': 'Live From New York' author goes deep on Lorne Michaels' legacy and the future of 'Saturday Night Live'" has been corrected to reflect that the updated book is out in paperback edition this month.

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The Sept. 22 story "Scott Walker never stood a chance: Why this awkward, Koch-backed Midwesterner was outrageously overrated" has been corrected to reflect that one midwesterner has been nominated from the midwest since Alf Landon in 1936. Bob Dole, like Landon a Kansan, was nominated by the GOP in 1996.

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The Sept. 19 story "Dad's 7 Dirty Words" has been corrected to reflect the correct date on which the author visited the Kent State Memorial.

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The Sept. 14 story "The burden of representation: Dodging stereotypes, pushing down walls and what's really at stake when there's 'just one' like you on TV" misidentified Constance Wu's alma mater as Juilliard. The story has been corrected.

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The Sept. 9 story "Fall TV Preview: On Wednesdays, CBS will try to build a better medical drama, Comedy Central spoofs 'Miami Vice,' and 'Empire' returns" erroneously stated that Frances Conroy, Michelle Pfeiffer and Alexander Skarsgard would appear in the upcoming season of "American Horror Story." The story has been corrected.

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The Sept. 8 story "Fall TV Preview: Tuesdays bring a murderous sorority, Muppets and the slow path to the atomic bomb" misidentified Olivia Williams as Olivia Wilde. The story has been corrected.

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The Sept. 3 story "Mark Ruffalo says his Catholic Church sex abuse film is 'a perfect opportunity' for the Vatican 'to begin to right these wrongs'" misidentified the character of Ben Bradlee Jr. as Ben Bradlee. The story has been corrected.

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In the Aug. 28 story "Celebrity killer culture: When grandiosity, privilege and entitlement turn attention-seeking into violence," the actor who played Travis Bickle in "Taxi Driver" was misidentified as Dustin Hoffman. That actor is Robert De Niro. The story has been corrected.

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In the Aug. 27 story "30 people Taylor Swift hasn't performed with (yet)," the story neglected to identify Matt LeBlanc (Joey) as one of the cast members of "Friends" who has, indeed, performed with Taylor Swift. The story has been corrected.

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In the Aug. 24 story "Quentin Tarantino's favorite TV shows may surprise you," actor Walton Goggins was misidentified as Walter Goggins. The story has been corrected.

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The Aug. 15 story "This is the laziest rhyme in all of songwriting history — and great artists use it all the time" originally stated that Johnny Cash avoided rhyming "fire" with "desire" in his song "Ring of Fire," when in fact Cash did in the first verse ("Bound by wild desire/ I fell into a ring of fire"). The story has been corrected.

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The Aug. 1o story "After 'True Detective,' HBO needs a new hit: Here's why 'Westworld' could be its next great show" originally stated that "Westworld" is based on a Michael Crichton novel, adapted into a movie. The 1973 "Westworld" was an original film directed by Crichton, not based upon a novel. The story has been corrected.

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The Aug. 10 story "The 'hot mess' humblebrag: Successful white women still love to pretend their lives are in shambles" originally stated that Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is the chief justice. The story has been corrected.

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The July 28 AlterNet story "The Thrill -- and Taboo -- of Public Sex" originally suggested that nudist colonies are sex-permissive environments. The story has been corrected.

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In the July 24 story "You Must Hear This! Maxine Brown's 'Stop'" Howard Tate was misidentified as Walter Tate. The error has been corrected.

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In the July 21 story "Dear White Progressives, stop telling Black people how to vote" a typographical error ascribed the creation of 19th-century Jim Crow laws to the 20th century. The error has been corrected.

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The July 6 story "We need a new Democratic party: On TPP, workers' rights and income inequality, they are as bad as GOP" was originally headlined "Let’s abandon the Democrats: On TPP, workers’ rights and income inequality, they are as bad as GOP." The headline has been changed at the author's request.

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The July 6 story "'True Detective' recap: A redemption, a murder, a rescue and a descent back into the underworld" misidentified Conway Twitty's "The Rose" as Harry Nilsson's "Without You." The story has been corrected.

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The July 3 story "I’m addicted to British jerks: Even the most awful TV dudes are sexy when they sound a bit posh" referred to actor Dylan Moran's accent as British, when in fact he is Irish. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 29 story "The 6 most hysterical right-wing responses to SCOTUS' same-sex marriage ruling" referred to Bobby Jindal as the former, rather than the current, governor of Louisiana. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 19 story "How Pope Francis just destroyed the GOP's religious con artists" identified the pope's encyclical on climate change as an apostolic exhortation. The story has been corrected.

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The June 18 story "'Dope': This provocative (and hilarious) black-nerd odyssey might be this year's perfect summer film" mistakenly referred to the the character Diggy, played by Kiersey Clemons, as Nakia, played by Zoe Kravitz. The story has been corrected.

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The June 16 story "James Taylor, man out of time: 'I feel like I’m a messenger from a prior world'" mistakenly identified a James Taylor original song as an Elvis Presley cover. The story has been corrected.

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The May 28 story "What TLC's Duggar decision will tell us: Who's winning the culture war between social justice and Christian 'grace'?" mistakenly included Anna Duggar, Josh Duggar's wife, in a list of his younger sisters. The story has been corrected.

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The May 27 story "Scott Walker: Women should be forced to have transvaginal ultrasounds because they are 'a cool thing'" mistakenly characterized a Wisconsin law requiring ultrasounds before abortions as requiring transvaginal sonograms. The does not require transvaginal probing. The headline and story have been corrected to reflect the error, which Salon regrets.

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The May 21 story "Feminist icon Vivian Gornick, still in the fight: A conversation with Jonathan Lethem" misidentified Gornick's book "Fierce Attachments" as "Fierce Alliances." The story has been corrected.

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The May 11 story "'Game of Thrones' politics: The perils of cultural assimilation during war" originally misidentified The Pact of the Isle of Faces, forged between the Children of the Forest and the First Men to bind them together to fight against the White Walkers during the Long Night, as The Pact of Ice and Fire. The story has been corrected.

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The May 11 story "Anatomy of a racist revolution: How the GOP was hijacked by small-state bigotry" originally misstated that Richard Nixon won every former Confederate state in the 1968 presidential election, when in reality he won five that year. (In 1972, he would go on to win every former Confederate state.) The story has been corrected.

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The May 8 story "Letterman’s nastiest feuds: 8 celebrities who tangled with Dave's sharp tongue and long memory" misidentified Harmony Korine as the director of the film "Kids." Korine is the writer of the film. The story has been corrected.

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The May 2 story "'I condemn the riots in the same breath that I condemn the police brutality, the systemic racism, the disenfranchisement of black America'" originally stated that Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech on riots took place 38 years ago. The speech, which was delivered in 1967, actually occurred 48 years ago. The story has been corrected.

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The April 28 story "North Dakota Republican admits Grindr user is 'outing' him in retaliation for antigay vote" originally stated that Rep. Randy Boehning was from Oklahoma instead of North Dakota. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 24 story "How to demolish the oligarchy in 3 easy steps" originally stated that Social Security was a defined contribution plan. In reality, it is typically regarded as a defined benefit plan, because the benefits are fixed. The story has been corrected.

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The April 21 story "You Must Hear This! Fairfield Parlour's 'Aries'" incorrectly stated that the Los Angeles band Kaleidoscope hailed from San Francisco. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 21 story "Roseanne Barr on Hillary 2016, the two-party system and the war on drugs: 'I'm way past that bulls**t'" incorrectly listed the final number of votes Barr received in the 2012 presidential election as 49,534 instead of 67,326. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 19 story "Marco Rubio’s deranged religion, Ted Cruz’s bizarre faith" included statements attributed to Ted Cruz's father that turned out to be false. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 16 story "Louis C.K. reveals why he quit Twitter: 'I think it's why everything is kind of f**ked up and polarizing'" incorrectly referred to the title of the Sirius XM show "Opie Radio" as "Opie Taylor." The story has been corrected.

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The April 15 story "Blood money, killer cops: How privatization is funding the racist logic of America's police" incorrectly stated that Robert Bates was a reserve police deputy when he shot Eric Harris. In reality, he was a reserve deputy in the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office, a law enforcement agency distinct from the Tulsa Police Department.

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The April 14 story "Bill Maher lashes out at anti-vaxx accusations: 'I’ve never argued that vaccines don’t work. I just don’t think you need them'" incorrectly referred to the title of Bill Maher's program as "Real Talk" with Bill Maher. The correct name is "Real Time With Bill Maher."

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The April 11 story "Why America hates its poor," originally published by our partner site The Daily Dot, incorrectly stated that Sam Brownback is the governor of Missouri. It also mistakenly made reference to Arkansas' rather than Missouri's punitive policies. Salon regrets the errors.

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The April 10 story "HBO's 'Silicon Valley' Leans In" incorrectly said that Kumail Nanjiani is also an actor on "The Big Bang Theory." The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 3 story "Short film 'Sundays' goes viral, sparks Hollywood's hottest bidding war: The age of the tiny movie with big ambitions is here" misidentified director Charles Wiedman as Christopher Weidman. The story has been corrected.

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The March 28 story "Mark Knopfler: 'This getting older stuff ain’t for wimps'" misidentified Basil Bunting's poem "Briggflatts" as "Break Flats." The story has been corrected.

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The March 31 story "I was a right-wing punching bad: My ill-fated encounter with conservative radio," originally published by our partner site AlterNet, failed to clarify that Barry Weintraub was the guest host of the "Alan Colmes Show" on the evening of the author's appearance. Salon regrets the oversight.

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The March 10 story "Texas fraternity under fire for reportedly forbidding 'deuschbags,' 'Mexicans' and interracial dating" failed to confirm that a circulating list of rules allegedly issued by the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity had been posted by the organization. The rules began circulating several years ago and were not issued by the fraternity -- a point that has been clarified in the article. Salon regrets the oversight.

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The March 9 story "Oklahoma frat boys sing disgusting racist chant in leaked video" originally included a photo of Oklahoma's University of Tulsa — rather than the University of Oklahoma, where the events described in the article in fact took place. The photo has been replaced. Salon regrets this error.

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The Feb. 27 story "9 things you think you know about Jesus that are probably wrong," originally published by our partner site AlterNet, overstated the possible connection between the number of apostles and its link to astrotheology. The point has been clarified, and Salon regrets the oversight.

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The Feb. 27 story "How Leonard Nimoy made Spock an American Jewish icon" misidentified Mr. Spock as Dr. Spock. The story has been corrected.

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The Feb. 18 story "Rick Scott's Corruption Spiral?" has been updated to clarify the specific illegality alleged in Rick Scott's private email accounts. The failure to turn over those emails upon request violates the law, not the mere existence of the private accounts. The story has been corrected.

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The Feb. 8 story "Terrorism's new boogeyman: Charles Krauthammer and the toxic myth of the 'lone wolf,'" originally published by our partner site TomDispatch.com, stated 1.5 percent of the U.S. population suffers from mental health problems. The number is closer to 19 percent. The story has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 6 review of "Jupiter Ascending" misidentified actress Tuppence Middleton as Felicity Jones. The story has been corrected.

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In a Feb. 3 interview with Melissa Silverstein, "'We are 50 percent of the population and our stories matter': Athena Film Festival founder Melissa Silverstein on sexism in Hollywood," Silverstein stated that no women had ever been nominated for Academy Awards for best screenplays. Women have been nominated in the past, but none in the most recent awards year. The story has been updated to reflect this note.

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The Jan. 26 story "American Sniper's Biggest Lie" stated that Michael Moore was being recognized for his documentary "Bowling for Columbine" in 2005, when in fact it was "Fahrenheit 911." The story has been corrected.

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The Jan. 24 story "The 12 worst ideas religion has unleashed on the world" incorrectly stated that Hinduism was the only religion that still practiced blood sacrifice. In fact, some Muslims do as well during Eid al Adha, Feast of the Sacrifice. Salon regrets the error.

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The Jan. 15 story "Why porn is exploding in the Middle East" incorrectly stated that porn star Mia Khalifa is a Muslim. She is not. Salon regrets the error.

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The January 14 story "'Serial' update: Adnan Syed's latest appeal denied" was initially incorrect. The appeal was not denied. It was based on a faulty report from Vox.com, which stated that the appeal was denied. The article has been updated to reflect this correction. Salon regrets this error.

2014 Corrections

Four of contributor CJ Werleman's stories for Salon, three of which were originally published by our partner site, AlterNet, have been discovered to contain passages that were either improperly sourced or plagiarized. In the interest of transparency, we have emboldened the sections of these articles in question and included hyperlinks to the original source material. Salon deeply regrets the oversight.

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The Oct. 18 story "Amazon's Wal-Mart Problem" has been updated to correct the description of Annie Lowrey’s argument, and to provide added detail on pro- and anti-monopoly arguments.

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In the Oct. 5 story "Why the GOP hates U.S. history: Inconvenient truths that freak out American conservatives," the battle over a new U.S. history curriculum was misattributed to a school district in Denver. The controversy actually took place in a suburb of Denver, in Jefferson County, Colorado.

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In the Sept. 16 story "The Satanic Temple's hilarious response to a pro-religion court ruling," the deck of the story originally misstated that the Satanic Temple had handed out the pamphlets. It has yet to hand out the activity books. Salon regrets the error.

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The Sept. 4 story "10 of the most evil medical experiments in history," originally published by our partner website AlterNet, incorrectly stated that Dr. Eugene Saenger was awarded a gold medal by the American College of Radiology. In fact, he received the award from the Radiological Society of North America. Salon regrets the error.

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The Aug. 16 story "The truth about the 'Ice Bucket Challenge'" previously misidentified Professor Robert Frank's book. It is “What Price the Moral High Ground?" not "Giving: Western Ideas of Philanthropy." Salon regrets the error.

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The Aug. 18 story "Rick Perry's indictment is bad for Democrats" erroneously stated that like Rick Perry, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has also been indicted. This has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

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The Aug. 2 story "4 reasons GOP's new 'war for women' is a ridiculous joke," first published by our partner website AlterNet, incorrectly suggested that prescription birth control offers protection from sexually transmitted diseases. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 28 story "New Republic/Ivy League Hypocrisy Watch" misattributed a quote by George Scialabba to Russell Jacoby. The story has been corrected.

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The July 23 story "The chilling reason our government wants to erase this man from history," first published by Creative Time Reports, erroneously stated that the visitors of Communications Management Unit prisoners are subjected to a strip search prior to visitation. In fact, the prisoners themselves are subjected to a strip-search. Salon regrets this error.

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The July 15 story "Why Christians get the 10 commandments wrong," first published by our partner site AlterNet, failed to acknowledge that the 10 commandments are repeated, approximately, in the book of Deuteronomy. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 11 story "Why CNN is so afraid of admitting that America's terror attacks are right-wing," first published by our partner site AlterNet, originally stated that Jerad Miller was killed by his wife, Amanda. He was in fact killed in a shootout with police. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 11 story "Elizabeth Warren faces right-wing stooge: Here's who's quietly funding her top critic" initially confused the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, where Matthew Chingos has not received support, with the Spencer Foundation, where he has. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 3 story "Tea Party's double agent: Sen. Ron Johnson has a new agenda" initially referred to an interview Johnson gave with the Ayn Rand Institute. It was with the Atlas Society instead. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 18 story "Is Amazon ruining dating in Seattle," first published by our partner site The Daily Dot, incorrectly attributed the practice of offering "comfort women" in World War II. It was the Japanese Imperial Army that provided women, mostly from occupied countries, to its soldiers. Salon regrets the error.

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The headline of the May 12 story "Koch-funded PAC slammed! Global warming is 'not something you turn on and off'" originally misidentified the Koch-funded group Americans for Prosperity as a super PAC. Salon regrets this error.

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The April 21 story "Saudi prince hunts down 2,100 protected birds in 21 days" originally misidentified the subject as Prince Fahad al Saud, who goes by @yolofahad on Instagram. The report in question actually concerns Prince Fahd bin Sultan. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 5 story "Woman allegedly fired for checking her email while on medical leave," originally published by our partner website The Daily Dot, originally stated that the woman in question had been dismissed while on maternity leave. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the March 28 story "Christie's creepy misogyny" put the word "erratic" in quotes when describing how the Mastro report described Bridget Kelly. Though many published reports put the word in quotes, the actual report never uses that precise word. It calls Kelly's behavior "aberrational," among other loaded negative adjectives. Salon regrets not searching the document to make sure "erratic" indeed appeared. The story has been corrected.

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The March 4 article titled "BP fails to get out of compensating oil spill victims" originally misstated BP's settlement with oil spill victims as being $9.2 million. In reality, the settlement was for the sum of $9.2 billion.

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The Feb. 10 article originally titled "10 worst right-wing moments of the week — Victoria Jackson is running for Congress," first published by our partner site AlterNet.org, incorrectly stated that Victoria Jackson was running for a seat in Congress. Jackson is running for a seat on a county commission in Tennessee. Salon regrets this error.

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The Jan. 27 article originally titled "10 worst right-wing moments of the week — Huckabee's libido and the persecuted 1% edition," first published by our partner site AlterNet.org, incorrectly stated that Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler was from Montana.  She represents the 4th congressional district in Missouri. Salon regrets the error.

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The Jan. 19 article originally titled "What I learned from a week on food stamps: Paul Ryan couldn't be any more wrong" has been updated. An earlier version of this article stated that a single New Yorker making less than a gross monthly income limit of $1,174 would qualify for a maximum of $200 a month. That gross monthly income limit figure was from 2010 and the story has been updated to reflect numbers as of Oct. 1, 2013.

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The Jan. 2 article titled "10 signs that religious fundamentalism is going down," originally published by our partner site AlterNet, stated that marriage equality became law in Ohio in December 2013. It did not. It also suggested that Cameron Diaz is an atheist. She has stated that she is not. Salon regrets the errors.

2013 Corrections

The Dec. 15 article originally titled "Facebook released my private messages from college," first published by our partner site The Daily Dot, incorrectly stated that Facebook accidentally released the author's private messages. Facebook clarifies that they were in fact wall posts. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 10 article "4 African leaders who learned nothing from Nelson Mandela," originally published by our partner site GlobalPost, incorrectly stated that Equatorial Guinea was originally a Portuguese colony. It was in fact a Spanish colony. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 7 story "Millennial, hardworking, homeless" has been clarified to note that the D.C. General shelter has changed management since sex allegations arose there. A clarification was made on Dec. 10, 2013.

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The Dec. 5 article "Wall street is designing the future of public education as a money-making machine," originally published by our partner site AlterNet, was amended to remove a reference to ERN's contributions to SFER, and to clarify the nature of Matt Kramer's relationship to SFER. He is a former, not current, board member. Additionally, three not two incumbents were re-elected in the Atlanta race, and an language was added to clarify the nature of the malfunctions that occurred with Amplify's donated tablets. Salon regrets the error.

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The Dec. 4 article "Max Blumenthal: I knew Alterman would freak out" quotes author Max Blumenthal suggesting that Eric Alterman "call[ed] on" his allies to criticize the former's book. This could not be corroborated and has since been clarified. Salon regrets the oversight. A clarification was made on Dec. 11, 2013.

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The Nov. 17 article ”Meet the Catholic extremists who could shatter the church” initially misstated the University where Gavin D’Costa teaches. He is a professor at the University of Bristol. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. The correction was made Nov. 20, 2013. The piece also incorrectly stated that Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre refused to sign Vatican II documents and a correction was made Nov. 25, 2013.

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The Nov. 13 story "Corporate America's new scam: Industry P.R. firm poses as think tank!" inadvertently confused the American Beverage Association with the American Beverage Institute. While the ABA is the trade group for the sugary drink industry, the ABI is a group representing the interests of the alcoholic beverage industry. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. A correction was made Nov. 14, 2013.

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The Nov. 3 story "Stop Calling JFK Conservative" mistakenly stated that a Kennedy Supreme Court nominee who had written the dissent in Roe v. Wade had also written the concurring opinion in the case legalizing the use of contraceptives. In fact, he and another Kennedy appointee, Arthur Goldberg, wrote the concurring opinion. The story was corrected on Nov. 4, 2013.

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The Nov. 1 article "4 Insane things rich people blow their money on" initially listed an expensive yacht that was a hoax. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 11/1/13]

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The Oct. 25 article "How shameless con artists took over the GOP" originally stated that Ted Cruz's father, Rafael Cruz, is a member of Purifying Ministries, founded by Suzanne Hinn. However, it is not clear whether the Texas-based Purifying Ministries is the same group founded by Hinn. Salon regrets the error.

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An earlier version of the Sept. 22 article "5 most offensive Asian characters in TV history" originally stated that Fox News, rather than Fox, has refused to reshoot the pilot episode of "Dads." The piece has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

 

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An earlier version of the Sept. 16 article "Chickens Are Killing the Planet" failed to distinguish between egg-laying and broiler chickens in a paragraph about how chickens are raised. The story has been corrected.

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The July 26 article "Leave Huma Abedin alone!" originally published by PolicyMic, mischaracterized a tweet by Lauren Wolfe. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 19 article "Don't fall for Wal-Mart's latest hypocrisy" originally suggested that approximately 80 percent of Wal-Mart workers are on food stamps. While that statistic has been used frequently, studies have not verified it. Salon regrets the error.

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The July 1 article "We must hate our children" originally noted that 10 states spend more on prison than on all education programs. It should have said "higher education." Salon regrets the error.

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The June 24 article "Pot farmers threaten endangered species," originally published by Earth Island Journal, said that Humbolt resident Kerry Reynolds launched the campaign against rodenticide. In fact, the campaign was a joint effort by Penny Andres, Uti Deva, and Kerry Reynolds. Salon regrets the error.

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The June 22 article "Klansman and accomplice charged for building radiation gun," originally published by the Southern Poverty Law Center, contained a photograph that suggested a possible connection between the Ku Klux Klan and the Nation of Israel. The photograph has been replaced, and Salon regrets the error.

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The June 13 article "Dark money buys state supreme court races," originally published by our partner the Center for Public Integrity, reported that Carrie Severino, chief counsel to the Judicial Crisis Network, had said that the Judicial Crisis Network’s strategy was to end judicial appointments and switch to judicial elections. Severino says she did not make this statement and that the JCN’s “objective is to promote judicial selection methods – be they elective or appointive – that are accountable to the people they serve. . . . [N]either I nor JCN has ever engaged in a strategy to end judicial appointments, nor have we promoted state judicial elections as a one-size-fits-all approach. On the contrary, we have applauded efforts to establish a federal style of judicial appointments in some states.”

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The May 28 article "Back to Fukushima: 'It was all very apocalyptic,'" originally published by The Walrus, falsely stated that 20,000 people died as a result of the Fukushima nuclear meltdown. Approximately 16,000 were killed by an earthquake and resulting tsunami. The article also incorrectly linked to World Health Organization and Greenpeace reports. Salon regrets the errors.

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The May 22 article "Is Pittsburgh the new Portland?" contained the wrong byline. The author of the piece is Jim Russell, geographer and contributor to Pacific Standard Magazine. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 21 article "Anyone regret slashing National Weather Service budget now?" mistakenly attributed the quote of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce directly to the American Institute of Physics. The Institute, however, was merely quoting the Commerce Secretary in its newsletter to its members. Salon regrets the error.

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The May 2 article "What anti-LGBT activists say 'off the record'" wrongly attributed a quote referring to Jeremy Hooper as "twice the son of hell" to Laurie Higgins of the Illinois Family Institute. Salon regrets the error.

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The April 12 article “On Gosnell "blackout," where were conservatives before this week?” misstated the number of stories the National Review has written about Kermitt Gosnell. While a search of their website turned up zero results, they have in fact written about it on occasion.

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The April 4 article "Spare us your salary sequestration stunts" misstated the president's salary. It is $400,000 a year, not $200,000. The story has been corrected, Salon regrets the error.


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The March 17 article "'Fiscally conservative' lawmaker happy to spend taxpayer millions defending unconstitutional abortion ban” incorrectly attributed a quote speculating about Gov. Jack Dalrymple's position on a six-week abortion ban to Lt. Gov. Drew H. Wrigley. The quote came from state Sen. Dwight Cook. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/19/13]

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The March 17 article "Holograms to preserve Holocaust survivors' legacies" wrongly stated that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., was working with researchers at the University of Southern California to incorporate these holograms into their collection. The museum is not involved in the project, and has no current plans to use the holograms. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 3 article “Football’s death spiral” originally indicated that a study that found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the brains of 33 deceased NFL players was conducted by the National Institutes of Health. The research was actually performed at Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 2/4/13.]

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The Feb. 3 article Take ecstasy, save your relationship" did not make explicit that Oxford ethicist Brian Earp does not advocate the taking of illegal drugs. There has also been a line added to contextualize Earp's thoughts on the ethical implications of chemically sustained love between parent and child in the last paragraph. Salon regrets the error.

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The Feb. 1 article "How Netflix Pulls Our Strings” incorrectly defined an exabyte as 1,000 gigabytes. An exabyte is 1 bllion gigabytes. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/1/13]

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The Jan 25 article "Will Computers Kill Gun Control?” initially referred to "automatic weapons" instead of "guns." The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error.

[Correction made 1/25/12]

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On Jan. 22, Salon republished an article from one of our content partners, the Weeklings, that was sympathetic to unfounded 9/11 conspiracies. The article slipped through our usual review process, and was clearly not up to our standards; we removed it as soon as it was brought to our attention by readers. Salon has a long history of debunking fringe conspiracists -- around Sept. 11, and more recently, Sandy Hook -- and are proud of those efforts. We regret this oversight.

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A Jan. 16 article entitled Postal Service on brink of bankruptcy used the term "bailout" as a potential solution to the service's financial ills. Salon regrets the error.

2012 Corrections

 

A Dec. 22 article entitled "Most racist restaurant in America?" incorrectly suggested that Kentucky's Maker's Mark Bourbon House and Lounge was owned by Maker's Mark. The story has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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A Dec. 7 article entitled "Video games are designed to get you hooked" incorrectly stated that the American Psychological Association is unwilling to recognize video game addiction as an official diagnosis. In fact, it is the American Psychiatric Association that the publishes the diagnosis manual. The story has been corrected, and Salon regrets the error.

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A Dec. 7 article “Obama inauguration raises $40M+” incorrectly attributed 2009 inauguration fundraising figures and that inauguration’s policy not to accept corporate money to the 2013 inauguration. The text has been corrected. We regret the errors.

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A Sept. 27 article incorrectly stated that the Screaming Sky Gallery is in Seattle. It is in Portland, Ore. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/27/12]

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The Sept. 26 article "Must-see morning clip" described dialogue from “The View” as depicted in a clip from "Conan" that was not an accurate depiction of original dialogue. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/26/12]

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The Sept. 19 article ”Will Chick-fil-A stop funding anti-gay groups?” initially quoted an incorrect press release from Civil Rights Agenda that said Focus on the Family had been classified as a hate group. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/20/12]

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The Sept. 1o article Who's to blame for NPR's super-white book list? initially mischaracterized Pamela Paul's role as a "judge" rather than as a member of an expert panel. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 9/11/12]

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The Aug. 27 article "Can Self-Publishing Buy Respect" incorrectly stated that Publishers Weekly sells reviews. PW does not, in fact, sell reviews for self-published or traditionally published books. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/29/12]

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The Aug. 14 article "Cut, Paste, Plagiarize" incorrectly stated that Elizabeth Flock was "pushed from her job" at the Washington Post. In fact, she resigned voluntarily. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 8/15/12]

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In the Aug. 10 story "Don't Put Mountain Dew in a Baby Bottle" the correct name for the heathcare model referenced is CenteringPregnancy, not Health Centering. And the program was developed for prenatal care, rather than neonatal care, as the piece originally said. The story has been corrected. ‬ [Correction made 8/10/12]

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The July 11 article "Ten Bands I Will Be Forced to Listen to in Hell" originally misstated the name of the band They Might Be Giants. It also included text in the Pearl Jam section that the author did not intend for the final draft. The story has been corrected.‬ [Correction made 7/11/12]

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The June 23, 2012, story "LGBT's Worst Foe: The Closet Monster" had several errors in describing former Rep. Bob Bauman, R-Md. We originally wrote that Bauman "voted to deny federal funds to lawyers working on behalf of gay rights," but Bauman opposed federal subsidies for all lawyers, not just those representing gay rights. It also erroneously suggested that Bauman tried to solicit sex from an underage male prostitute; but the male in question was 16, an adult under the laws of Washington, D.C. Bauman also did not resign from his reelection campaign; he lost in the general election. Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 7/4/12]

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The June 23, 2012, story "LGBT's Worst Foe: The Closet Monster" incorrectly said which state former U.S. Rep. Ed Schrock represented. He was a Republican from Virginia. We also had a photo of the wrong man accompanying the post. Both mistakes have been corrected. [Correction made 6/25/12]

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The April 19 story "Can Mitt Talk to Women" originally said that Carrel Hilton Sheldon had an abortion "late" in her pregnancy after discovering she had a life-threatening blood clot. Sheldon had the abortion early in her pregnancy, after eight weeks. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/16/12]

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‪The April 30 article "Occupy's Other Big Test" originally implied that MoveOn created and named several "99 Percent" initiatives, including the 99% Voter Pledge. While MoveOn has sponsored these campaigns, it has not, in most cases, created or named them. The language of the piece has been updated to reflect this.‬ [Correction made 5/3/12]

 

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In the Feb. 7, 2012, story "Will Obama Compromise on Birth Control," a quote by an unnamed reporter was erroneously attributed to ABC News reporter Jake Tapper. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/8/12]

2011 Corrections

 

A quote that was erroneously attributed to Michelle Malkin has been removed from the June 21 story "The Man Behind the Glitter Revolution." The quote was in fact from a commenter on Malkin's site. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/24/11]

 

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The June 20, 2011, story "Could Flogging Solve Our Prison Crisis" initially stated that "the Corrections Corporation of America helped draft anti-immigration laws," a reference to the draft legislation that later became Arizona SB 1070. CCA has brought it to our attention that although CCA did have a representative at the ALEC meeting where model legislation similar to 1070 was drafted, CCA was not involved in drafting the language. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/8/12]

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The June 2 story "Sasha Grey joins Lindsay Lohan in gallery shorts" incorrectly identified the director of this film as Todd Phillips. The artist is, in fact, Richard Phillips. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 6/2/11]

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The May 6 story "Lady Gaga on 'American Idol'" erroneously summarized year-old reports about Lady Gaga's May 5, 2010, appearance on "American Idol," mistakenly suggesting that her appearance was on May 5, 2011. Salon has corrected the story and regrets the error. [Correction made 5/6/11]

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The Feb. 28 article "Proactiv's Celebrity Shell Game" incorrectly suggested that Dr. Benabio said the "before and after" pictures used by Proactiv were Photoshopped. The dermatologist did not make that claim. Further, the basic Proactiv system costs $19.95, not $59.95, as the article originally stated. Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 3/21/11]

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We have altered the language of the Dec. 30 story "Judith Miller: From the Times to the Nuts" after several media outlets amended their coverage and we received a request from Newsmax. We never intended to imply that its business practices violate any laws. [Correction made 1/18/11]

 

2010 Corrections

 

The Dec. 16 story "Keith Olbermann 'suspends' Twitter account over Assange furor" incorrectly stated that Assange had been charged in the rape case in Sweden. He had been arrested in London on an extradition warrant, but had not been charged. [Correction made 12/16/10.]

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The Sept. 6 story "Inside the Strange World of Hoarders" stated that the Beales in the film "Grey Gardens" were sisters. They were mother and daughter. [Correction made 9/7/10.]

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Joan Walsh's Aug. 25 blog post "Beck has a scheme" was originally accompanied by an iconic photo of Martin Luther King Jr. that was mistakenly used and attributed to the Library of Congress. The photo is actually the copyrighted work of Bob Adelman/Magnum Photos. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 8/26/10]

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The story "Jon Stewart Was Born to Bash Obama" contained three inaccuracies: Stewart began his "Daily Show" tenure in 1999, so the assertion that he had never done the job during a Democratic presidency was incorrect. The "Daily Show" segment on Obama's All Star pitch aired on July 15, 2009, not June 15, 2009. And the banner displayed during a satiric bit on the BP oil spill read "Commission Accomplished," not "Mission Accomplished." Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 6/23/10]

 

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The June 16 Broadsheet post "Study: Fat Women Starved of Sex" originally stated that "obese men had just as much nookie as average guys." It should have read, "obese men were just as likely to have had a sexual partner in the last 12 months as average guys." [Correction made 6/16/10]

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The May 17 Broadsheet post "Miss USA Stripping Scandal: How Shocking!" incorrectly stated that Miss Nevada Katie Rees lost her title after the emergence of a "hardcore pornographic photo shoot." The photos in question were not actually pornographic. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/17/10]

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The May 3 story "United and Continental Tie the Knot" mistakenly said that United and Continental logged 177 million and 133 million revenue passenger kilometers, respectively. That should be 17.7 billion and 13.3 billion. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 5/11/10]

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A Broadsheet item about blogger Judith Torrea said that the death toll from the drug war in Ciudad Juárez was roughly 22,700. That is the figure for all of Mexico. The correct death toll for Juárez is roughly 4,324. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 4/15/10]

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In the April 5 story "My Antidepressant Gets Hard to Swallow," the author of the book "Listening to Prozac" was misidentified. The author is Peter D. Kramer. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 4/5/10]

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The March 31 story "We Should Be Policing Wall Street" incorrectly stated that a whistle-blower who'd alerted Ernst & Young to fraud had been fired by Ernst & Young. He was fired by Lehman Brothers. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/31/10]

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The March 16 story "Bring It On, Ayn Rand Geeks" originally stated that Ron Paul's son, Rand Paul, was named after Ayn Rand. Rand Paul claims that is not true. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 3/17/10]

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The Feb. 3 "James O'Keefe's Race Problem" reported that O'Keefe, the
conservative activist arrested on charges he plotted to tamper with
Sen. Mary Landrieu's phone lines, helped plan a conference on "Race
and Conservatism" that featured white nationalist Jared Taylor. The
freelance photographer who attended the event, and snapped O'Keefe's
photo there, now says the right-wing provocateur helped out at the
conference, but cannot confirm that he helped plan it. The story has been corrected.

The article also said that O'Keefe was terminated by the right-wing
Leadership Institute in 2008, after videos were released of O'Keefe
calling Planned Parenthood and offering to donate money to abort
black babies. He was let go in 2007. Leadership Institute co-founder Morton Blackwell told the New York Times O'Keefe "wanted to do
sting operations that would affect legislation; he made some calls
which have been covered in the news media to Planned Parenthood. That
was beyond the scope of what we had hired him to do. We are an
educational organization. We are not an activist organization." Blackwell says he told O'Keefe to choose between his job and his activism, "and he said he was committed to the activism," according to the Times. The
date of O'Keefe's termination has been corrected, and Blackwell's
explanation has been added to the story.

Also, David Almasi is the director of Project 21, not the founder, as originally
stated.

Salon regrets the errors. [Correction made 2/5/10]

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The Jan. 25 article "Is the President Panicking" originally stated that Fox News led the charge against Bill Clinton in the '94 midterm elections. Fox News did not come into being until 1996. The story has been corrected. [Correction made 1/27/10]

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Heather Michon's Jan. 19 article "Is It Racist to Report on Looting in Haiti?" neglected to attribute an observation about the connotations of the word "looting" in multiple languages to a post by Marc Herman at Global Voices. [Correction made 1/22/10]

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A Jan. 23 books feature about Chinua Achebe contained a typo in the name of the author. It is Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, not Chinamanda Ngozi Adichie.

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A Jan. 13 War Room post incorrectly stated that the Federation for American Immigration Reform had provided funding for Americans for Legal Immigration PAC, citing the Southern Poverty Law Center's Web site. But the Web site says only that FAIR "supports" ALIPAC. In fact, ALIPAC has not received funding from the federation. [Correction made 1/14/10]

 

2009 Corrections

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In Stephanie Zacharek's Dec. 9 review of "A Single Man," it was incorrectly
stated that Tom Ford designed for Yves Saint Laurent before moving to
Gucci. In fact, Ford worked as creative director of Gucci from 1996 to
2004, and also designed for Yves Saint Laurent after that house was
acquired by Gucci in 1999. [Correction made 12/14/09]

---------------------------

In the Dec. 9 story, Price Check: Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label the article misstated the price differences between retail bottles of wine, and restaurant bottles. The price difference numbers provided included an erroneous extra 100%.

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In the Dec. 8 Broadsheet post "'Curing' Gays Turns to Killing," Richard Cohen, author of "Coming Out Straight: Understanding and Healing Homosexuality," was incorrectly referred to as a Washington Post columnist. There is a newspaper columnist of the same name, but he is a different person. [Correction made 12/8/09]

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The Aug. 14 story "Whose side of the road are you on," incorrectly stated that Samoa was the first country to change the side of the road it drove on since 1967. In fact, Iceland made the change in 1968 and Burma in 1970. [Correction made 8/13/09]

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In the Aug. 12 story "Obama's Healthcare Horror," we incorrectly said that the White House counsel had been fired. In fact, there has been speculation in the press reports that the White House counsel will be fired -- but he has not been. [Correction made 8/13/09]

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The July 28 story href="http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2009/07/28/immigrant_president/">"Immigrants
Should Be Eligible for the Presidency" originally contained a
paragraph stating that several Founding Fathers, including Alexander
Hamilton, were ineligible for the presidency because of the
circumstances of their birth. This paragraph was inaccurate and has been
deleted from the story. [Correction made 7/29/09]

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In the June 22 Since You Asked column "I'm Stuck in Atlanta, He's Stuck in Seattle," certain identifying details have been removed to protect the privacy of the people involved. [Correction made 6/23/09]

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The June 6 story "The Learjet Repo Man" initially stated that Pat Sage is Nick Popovich's wife. She is his ex-wife. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 6/11/09]

-----------------------

The April 13 "Ask a Wingnut" column "The
Wingnut Explains Michele Bachmann"
originally stated that Minnesota
was a major producer of coal. The article has been corrected to say that
Minnesota's electricity production is heavily dependent on coal. Salon
regrets the error. [Correction made 4/13/09]

-----------------------

A March 25 Broadsheet post "Anti-abortion Stunt Girl Strikes Again" incorrectly stated that Live Action's Lila Rose project was funded by Dr. James Dobson. It is, in fact, not funded by Dobson. The article has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/26/09]

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The March 18 story "Just How Bad Off Is the Republican Party (Part 2)?" originally stated that Kansas Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson would not be running for governor in 2010 because of questions about a relationship with an aide. In fact, Parkinson is not running so that he can tend to his family business. A researcher confused Parkinson with former Kansas Attorney General Paul Morrison, who left office in 2008 because of a sex scandal. The story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/18/09]

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The March 11 story "Why Is Jim Cramer Shouting at Me?" originally stated that Wall Street's closing bell is at 4:30 p.m. It is at 4 p.m., and the story has been corrected. Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/12/09]

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The March 4 story "Predatory Lending With a Smiley Face" stated that "no-doc, option ARM, cash-out and other toxic mortgages" were still advertised on mortgage broker Ty Youngblood's Web site at the time of the story's publication. The story has been corrected and now reads: "no-doc, option ARM, cash-out and other toxic mortgages, some of which were still advertised on his Web site earlier this year, but are no longer." Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 3/5/09]

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The Feb. 13 story "Pardon the Bush Miscreants" misrepresented a Gallup poll. The story has been corrected and now reads: "In a poll released yesterday by the Gallup Organization, 38 percent favors criminal sanctions against officials who authorized torture or other outrages in the "war on terror," while another 24 percent favors an investigation without criminal charges. At the same time, 34 percent prefers that the Obama administration simply leave its wayward predecessors be." Salon regrets the error. [Correction made 2/17/09]

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In the Feb. 11 story "Bigfoot Lives," a quote by photographer Jeremy Holden read: "I had spent time in New Guinea trying to photograph a habituated
 troop of 19 chimpanzees." It should have read: "I had spent time in Guinea trying to photograph a habituated
 troop of 19 chimpanzees." The story has been corrected. [Correction made 2/12/09]

 





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