Carter: No pure democracy in Florida


Geraldine Sealey
September 27, 2004 7:10PM (UTC)

Former President Jimmy Carter has monitored 50 elections around the world, so he knows a thing or two about free and fair elections -- and he's warning that Florida's presidential vote in 2004 looks again to be marred with trouble that will "likely" throw the legitimacy of the result into question. The voting arrangements in Florida don't meet "basic international requirements," Carter writes in a Washington Post op-ed this morning. And Florida's voting problems are rooted in and are compounded by political biases on the part of elections officials, Carter writes:

"Four years ago, the top election official, Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris, was also the co-chair of the Bush-Cheney state campaign committee. The same strong bias has become evident in her successor, Glenda Hood, who was a highly partisan elector for George W. Bush in 2000. Several thousand ballots of African Americans were thrown out on technicalities in 2000, and a fumbling attempt has been made recently to disqualify 22,000 African Americans (likely Democrats), but only 61 Hispanics (likely Republicans), as alleged felons."

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"The top election official has also played a leading role in qualifying Ralph Nader as a candidate, knowing that two-thirds of his votes in the previous election came at the expense of Al Gore. She ordered Nader's name be included on absentee ballots even before the state Supreme Court ruled on the controversial issue. Florida's governor, Jeb Bush, naturally a strong supporter of his brother, has taken no steps to correct these departures from principles of fair and equal treatment or to prevent them in the future."

"It is unconscionable to perpetuate fraudulent or biased electoral practices in any nation. It is especially objectionable among us Americans, who have prided ourselves on setting a global example for pure democracy. With reforms unlikely at this late stage of the election, perhaps the only recourse will be to focus maximum public scrutiny on the suspicious process in Florida."


Geraldine Sealey

Geraldine Sealey is senior news editor at Salon.com.

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