David Koch (Reuters/Brendan Mcdermid)

Koch-funded PAC slammed! Global warming is "not something you turn on and off"

An online-only clip of James Cameron's "Years of Living Dangerously" examines Chris Christie's climate flip-flop


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Sarah Gray
May 12, 2014 6:40PM (UTC)

Showtime's "Years of Living Dangerously," produced by James Cameron, tackles climate change and its dramatic impact on our world. The show presents a wide range of issues -- from the broad and devastating impact of rising sea levels, to how the debate hits closer to home.

In an online-only clip from the show, New York Times columnist Mark Bittman explores why New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped New Jersey out of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) -- a cap-and-trade system involving nine states. This investigation brings him to Americans for Prosperity (AFP), a PAC that was started by oil and gas barons Charles and David Koch, who have a vested interest in denying climate change for financial gain. (They're even going after solar panels.) They also have deep pockets that greatly influence climate policy -- and according to the clip, have influenced Christie.

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In the segment below, Bittman spars with former director of New Jersey's branch of Americans for Prosperity, Steve Lonegan. Faced with a discussion on the science of global warming, Longean said, "I don't even want to argue the point. To me it's not that important."

For those of us without Showtime, the first episode can be watched for free below:

h/t Grist


Sarah Gray

Sarah Gray is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on innovation. Follow @sarahhhgray or email sgray@salon.com.

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