Richard Spencer leads torch-lit white supremacy march in Charlottesville

In what was deemed a success by their leader, Spencer and white supremacists returned to Charlottesville

By Charlie May

Published October 8, 2017 10:02AM (EDT)

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" exchange insults with counter-protesters as they attempt to guard the entrance to Emancipation Park (Getty/Chip Somodevilla)
White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" exchange insults with counter-protesters as they attempt to guard the entrance to Emancipation Park (Getty/Chip Somodevilla)

Alt-right leader Richard Spencer and his gang of white nationalist neo-Nazis emerged in Charlottesville once again on Saturday night. The group wielded torches and chanted "you will not replace us" as they stood in front of the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, which has been covered in black tarp.

In August, Spencer and white supremacists descended on Charlottesville and held a torch-lit march that poured into a massive rally organized by the alt-right the following day and resulted in the murder of peaceful activist, Heather Hayer.

 

"It was a planned flash mob," Spencer said of Saturday's torch-lit march, according to the Washington Post. "It was a great success. We’ve been planning this for a long time."

"We wanted to prove that we came in peace in May, we came in peace in August, and we come again in peace," he added.

Only white supremacy and Nazism does not come in peace. In August the participants chanted "Jews will not replace us" but on Saturday night the group chanted "you will not replace us," meaning white people. 

The group also chanted that the South would "rise again," the New York Times reported.

It's not clear how many were in attendance but some reports indicated roughly three dozen gathered in Emancipation Park.

"Our identity matters. We are not going to stand by and allow people to tear down these symbols of our history and our people – and we’re going to do this again," Spencer explained, the Post reported.  

 

The march was quickly condemned by Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer who called them "cowards" in a tweet on Saturday night.

"Another despicable visit by neo-Nazi cowards. You’re not welcome here! Go home! Meantime we’re looking at all our legal options. Stay tuned," Signer wrote.

Spencer responded to the tweet saying the two should "catch up next time we're in town." "It was great to be back in C'ville. We can catch up next time we're in town," Spencer wrote.  

President Donald Trump was blasted for his milquetoast response to the August rally where he downplayed the violence and condemned both sides of the protest.

Trump, who frequently issues early-morning tweets, has not said anything about Saturday's rally as of the publication of this article.

 


Charlie May

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