Marjorie Taylor Greene: "It really hurts to be called anti-Semite or racist"

"No one has ever called me that before in my life until the left-wing media decided to attack me"

By Travis Gettys
March 19, 2021 9:30AM (UTC)
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Marjorie Taylor Greene (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on Raw Story

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-G., claimed ignorance as her defense for spreading an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory.

The Georgia Republican suggested in a November 2018 post on Facebook that the wildfire that ravaged California was started with a laser beam as part of an effort to clear land for building a high-speed rail project involving corporate and banking interests, such as the Rothschild family — but Greene insisted she wasn't aware of the anti-Semitic implications of her claims, reported Forward.

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"I didn't even know and didn't find out until recently that the Rothschilds were Jewish," Greene told the print-only Ami Magazine.

The lawmaker visited Orthodox neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Long Island earlier this week organized by the conservative Chovevei Zion congregation, and said she was unfamiliar with the banking dynasty that has long been the target of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

"I can tell you I have no idea what 'Jewish space laser' means because I never said it," she said. "The community I have got to spend time with today is very similar to the people I have in my life."

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Greene blamed the criticism on the media, saying her views had never been called into question like that until she entered politics.

"It really hurts to be called anti-Semite or racist," Greene said. "No one has ever called me that before in my life until the left-wing media decided to attack me."


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Georgia Marjorie Taylor Greene Politics Racism Raw Story Republicans