Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg's financial documents subpoenaed by prosecutors: report

Weisselberg has been part of the family's financial side since he worked for Fred Trump, Sr.

By Sarah K Burris
April 1, 2021 10:30AM (UTC)
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Donald Trump (C) delivers remarks with his children (L-R) Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump during the grand opening ceremony of the new Trump International Hotel October 26, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on Raw Story

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The New York Times reported Wednesday that Trump Organization CFO Allen Wiesselberg's financial records are being examined by state prosecutors in Manhattan as part of the investigation into former President Donald Trump.

According to the report, people familiar with the matter say that the prosecutors are looking at the personal gifts that Weisselberg and his family received from Trump

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"In recent weeks, the prosecutors have trained their focus on the executive, Allen H. Weisselberg, in what appears to be a determined effort to gain his cooperation," the report explained. "Mr. Weisselberg, who has not been accused of wrongdoing, has overseen the Trump Organization's finances for decades and may hold the key to any possible criminal case in New York against the former president and his family business."

Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance is looking into whether Trump and the Trump Organization falsified financial documents to score loans from banks or to pay lower taxes.

It's unknown if Weisselberg would cooperate with prosecutors about the inner workings of the Trump Org. but if investigators find financial improprieties in his financial data, Vance could use it to get a cooperation agreement.

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Weisselberg has been part of the Trump family's financial side since he worked for Fred Trump, Sr.

There are two dozen properties for which that the Trump Org. didn't give internal documents and ledgers when subpoenaed last year, the sources told The Times.

"The ledgers offer a line-by-line breakdown of each property's financial situation, including daily receipts, checks and revenues," the report explained. "The prosecutors could compare those details against the information the company provided to its lenders and local tax authorities to assess whether it fraudulently misled them."

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Read the full story at The New York Times.


Sarah K Burris

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