(Screengrab via YouTube)

Michael Moore: Donald Trump didn't quote me fully

Trump didn't really finish Moore's sentence before taking the praise


Matthew Rozsa
October 28, 2016 5:26PM (UTC)

Michael Moore is distancing himself from Donald Trump's recent praise, saying that the Republican presidential nominee is mischaracterizing both what he said and his latest documentary, "Michael Moore in TrumpLand."

Appearing on Fox News with Megyn Kelly on Thursday night, Moore took issue with Trump who said that he agreed with Moore's statement that the Republican's campaign is “going to be the biggest fuck you ever recorded in human history. And it will feel good."

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As Moore pointed out, Trump cut off the clip of his speech after the word "good" and, in the process, omitted some crucial context provided by his very next line:

"... for a day, or maybe a week."

Never one to hold his tongue, Moore took advantage of his appearance on Kelly's show to elaborate on his real views about Trump.  “When you find out that your life isn’t going to get any better under President Trump and will probably get worse,” he explained, “that’s when you’re going to realize what the Brits have realized [post-Brexit].

"If we elect Donald Trump as president of this country, it won’t be the same country after four years,” he added. “I’m absolutely convinced of that. This is the most vile, disgusting candidate that’s ever run for office in this country.”

Moore also used this opportunity to communicate with Trump supporters themselves.

“I understand why you’re angry," he explained. "You have every right to be angry. The system has failed you, but he is not the solution to this.”

Although Moore is supporting Hillary Clinton in this election, he has not been shy about expressing concern that Trump could win. During a promotional event for his movie on Tuesday, Moore mentioned that "I know a lot of people in Michigan that are planning to vote for Trump, and they don’t necessarily agree with him."

He specifically cited Trump's economic populism as key to his political strength.

“Donald Trump came to the Detroit Economic Club and stood there in front of Ford Motor executives and said, ‘If you close these factories as you’re planning to do in Detroit and build them in Mexico, I’m going to put a 35 percent tariff on those cars when you send them back and nobody’s going to buy them,'" Moore noted. "It was an amazing thing to see. No politician, Republican or Democrat, had ever said anything like that to these executives, and it was music to the ears of people in Michigan and Ohio and Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — the ‘Brexit states.’”


Matthew Rozsa

Matthew Rozsa is a breaking news writer for Salon. He holds an MA in History from Rutgers University-Newark and is ABD in his PhD program in History at Lehigh University. His work has appeared in Mic, Quartz and MSNBC.

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Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Donald Trump Elections 2016 Megyn Kelly Michael Moore

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