(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Wilbur Ross, Donald Trump’s secretary of commerce nominee, has offshored 2,700 jobs since 2004

Wilbur Ross, the billionaire “king of bankruptcy,” offshored thousands of jobs in just over a decade


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Matthew Rozsa
January 17, 2017 6:16pm (UTC)

President-elect Donald Trump may like to tout his opposition to offshoring jobs on Twitter, but his choice of secretary of commerce conflicts with that agenda.

Companies controlled by Wilbur Ross, a billionaire known as "the king of bankruptcy" for buying struggling businesses and turning them around into profitability, cut roughly 2,700 jobs since 2004 by shipping their production into other countries, according to data obtained by Reuters under a Freedom of Information Act request on Tuesday. These included textile, finance, and auto-parts companies.

While this background isn't necessarily surprising for a Republican political appointment — 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney came under fire for investing in companies that shipped jobs overseas — it calls into question Trump's commitment to keeping American jobs in this country. Trump has repeatedly tried to take credit for saving jobs by either inflating the numbers or flat-out lying about his own efforts.

And, of course, he has also taken to a great deal of tough talk on Twitter.

It remains to be seen whether Trump's rhetoric or Ross's business background will prevail in determining whether American jobs are actually kept in America.


Matthew Rozsa

Matthew Rozsa is a breaking news writer for Salon. He holds an MA in History from Rutgers University-Newark and is ABD in his PhD program in History at Lehigh University. His work has appeared in Mic, Quartz and MSNBC.

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