FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016, file photo, Charlie Rose participates in the "CBS This Morning" panel at the CBS 2016 Winter TCA in Pasadena, Calif. The CBS News morning host said that he's undergoing heart surgery to replace a heart valve that was installed in 2005. The newsman's surgery is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, and he said Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, he plans to return to work in March. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File) (Richard Shotwell/invision/ap)

CBS' coverage of Charlie Rose is how allegations should be covered

On Tuesday morning, CBS tackled the Charlie Rose allegation head-on


Jeremy Binckes
November 21, 2017 12:54PM (UTC)

After eight women came forward to say that journalist and "CBS This Morning" co-anchor Charlie Rose sexually harassed them, a number of outlets — including CBS — announced they were suspending the longtime host.

On Tuesday morning, "CBS This Morning" opened by dealing with the harassment allegations head-on.

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“This is a moment that demands a frank and honest assessment about where we stand and more generally the safety of women," O'Donnell said on Tuesday's show. "Let me be very clear. There is no excuse for this alleged behavior. It is systematic and pervasive and I've been doing a lot of listening."

"Women cannot achieve equality in the workplace or in society until there is a reckoning and a taking of responsibility," O'Donnell added, promising that there "will be an investigation."

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Anchor Gayle King added her remarks, saying how the news affected her.

CBS is owed some kudos here. Immediately after news broke that NPR news chief Michael Oreskes was facing allegations of impropriety from decades ago, questions arose as to why NPR didn't cover the story more directly — like the Charlie Rose allegations, the Oreskes allegations were broken by The Washington Post.

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Over the coming weeks, we're likely to hear more stories about impropriety coming from men in powerful positions. It's rather refreshing to hear reactions from co-workers that echo those of O'Donnell. We can only hope that we'll see more of that.


Jeremy Binckes

Jeremy Binckes is the senior news editor at Salon.com.

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