Right-wing fumes after Hyde Amendment falls short in appropriations bill

A provision to preserve the Hyde Amendment narrowly failed — and sparked a coordinated right-wing hashtag campaign

By Zachary Petrizzo
Published July 16, 2021 9:26PM (EDT)
People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. The Alabama abortion law, signed by Gov. Kay Ivey last week, includes no exceptions for cases of rape and incest, outlawing all abortions except when necessary to prevent serious health problems for the woman. Though women are exempt from criminal and civil liability, the new law punishes doctors for performing an abortion, making the procedure a Class A felony punishable by up to 99 years in prison. (Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. The Alabama abortion law, signed by Gov. Kay Ivey last week, includes no exceptions for cases of rape and incest, outlawing all abortions except when necessary to prevent serious health problems for the woman. Though women are exempt from criminal and civil liability, the new law punishes doctors for performing an abortion, making the procedure a Class A felony punishable by up to 99 years in prison. (Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

The decades-old Hyde Amendment took one step closer to falling Friday, as the House Appropriations Committee passed a funding bill for the fiscal year of 2022 without the controversial provision — which, if passed, would allow for the allocation of resources from the federal government to fund abortion procedures if the patient is on Medicaid. 

In a post-committee meeting summary, the appropriations committee said the current bill will advance the "equal treatment for women by increasing funding for the range of health services, including family planning, covered by Title X and repealing the discriminatory Hyde Amendment." 

The proposed amendment to preserve Hyde failed on a 27-32 vote. 

In the wake of the vote, a right-wing messaging campaign was in full swing, with the conservative media apparatus and politicians all hopping on board to decry the "radical" move.

Former Trump administration Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted, "Washington Democrats have launched an all-out assault on the right to life, and they believe YOU should fund abortions. Support H.R. 18 to make the Hyde Amendment permanent. #HydeSavesLives." 

Other right-wing and conservative voices chimed in as well, many using the hashtag "#HydeSavesLives." 

Top-ranking House Republican lawmaker Steve Scalise joined in on the outrage: "For 40+ years, the Hyde Amendment has made sure taxpayer money doesn't fund abortion-on-demand—and it's always had bipartisan support. But now Democrats are working hard to eliminate it completely. That's how radical they've become," he stated. "Disgusting. #HydeSavesLives"

Others, including GOP Senator Tim Scott, South Dakota Republican Gov. Kristi Noem, and numerous others, further fumed over the Hyde Amendment's failure to pass alongside the appropriations bill:  


Zachary Petrizzo

Zachary Petrizzo is a staff writer at Salon. He previously covered politics at Mediaite and The Daily Dot. Follow him on Twitter @ZTPetrizzo. Send him tips: zpetrizzo@salon.com

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Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Abortion Aggregation Hyde Amendment Politics Right-wing Steve Scalise Tim Scott