Attorneys in Alex Jones' Sandy Hook defamation trial "mistakenly" give damning info to opposition

Jones had claimed that he had nothing on his phone pertaining to Sandy Hook, but his own lawyers proved otherwise

By Kelly McClure

Nights & Weekends Editor

Published August 3, 2022 5:35PM (EDT)

Alex Jones, host and founder of Infowars, an extreme right-wing program that often trafficks in conspiracy theories, is seen at a "Stop the Steal" rally against the results of the U.S. Presidential election outside the Georgia State Capitol on November 18, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
Alex Jones, host and founder of Infowars, an extreme right-wing program that often trafficks in conspiracy theories, is seen at a "Stop the Steal" rally against the results of the U.S. Presidential election outside the Georgia State Capitol on November 18, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

In the continuation of the defamation trial of InfoWars host, Alex Jones, attorney Mark Bankston — who represents the parents of a six-year-old boy shot and killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting — revealed that Jones' own attorneys "mistakenly" provided him with years worth of damning texts from Jones' cell phone.

Throughout the trial, which seeks damages caused by Jones making repeated statements to the effect that the Sandy Hook shooting was "a huge hoax," he has maintained that there was nothing included in the text messages on his cell phone pertaining to the shooting, or his thoughts on the shooting, which his attorneys have now proven to be false.

Bringing up a thread of texts on a screen within the court room, Bankston questioned Jones on the information gleaned from them, while reminding him of statements made during previous questionings.

"Do you know where I got this?" Bankston asked Jones. "Your attorneys messed up and sent me a digital copy of your entire cellphone, with every text message you've sent for the past two years." From here, Bankston informed Jones that his attorneys did nothing to mark the texts as privileged, leaving them open for use in the trial.

"This is your 'Perry Mason' moment," Jones said, while visibly taken aback. 

"You know what perjury is, right?" Bankston asked Jones after questioning him on the texts. "I just want to make sure before we go further."

"This clip of the Alex Jones trial of Sandy Hook learning his lawyer accidentally leaked his phone contents to the opposing team belongs in a museum. This is an Emmy worthy reveal," one person commented on Twitter, along with footage from the trial.


Want a daily wrap-up of all the news and commentary Salon has to offer? Subscribe to our morning newsletter, Crash Course.


 In addition to previously withheld texts regarding Sandy Hook, Bankston was also made privy to information contradicting Jones' claims that he was struggling financially. Jones had previously claimed that he "lost millions because of deplatforming," according to The Washington Post, but texts within the newly delivered bounty revealed that InfoWars revenue was on track to bring in $300 million a year.

"I mean I hate Alex Jones but not as much as Alex Jones' lawyer hates Alex Jones," political commentator Brian Tyler Cohen said on Twitter in response to the damning texts. 


By Kelly McClure

Kelly McClure is a journalist and fiction writer who lives in New Orleans. She is Salon's Nights and Weekends editor, and her work has been featured in Vulture, The A.V. Club, Vanity Fair, Cosmopolitan, Nylon, Vice, and elsewhere. She is the author of Something is Always Happening Somewhere

MORE FROM Kelly McClure


Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Aggregate Alex Jones Sandy Hook