Watch out, Jamie Lynn. Britney has a tell-all coming

The pop star will finally be able to control her narrative after landing a $15 million book deal

By Joy Saha

Published February 22, 2022 8:25PM (EST)

Honoree Britney Spears accepts the Vanguard Award onstage at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on April 12, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. (Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for GLAAD)
Honoree Britney Spears accepts the Vanguard Award onstage at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on April 12, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. (Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for GLAAD)

Britney Spears is finally getting the book treatment she deserves.

On Monday, the pop star secured a book deal with publishing company Simon & Schuster for her tell-all memoir. Page Six revealed the deal, which is "worth as much as $15 million," was obtained after a bidding war from multiple publishers. An inside source also told the gossip site that the deal "is one of the biggest of all time, behind the Obamas."  

In her memoir, Spears will discuss everything from her humble beginnings and famed music career to her strained relationships with family.  

The news of the book deal also comes after the recent release of her younger sister Jamie Lynn Spears' memoir, "Things I Should Have Said." In an interview with "Good Morning America," Jamie Lynn said she "adored" Britney and hailed her older sister as another mother figure in her life.

"So when she needed help, I set up ways to do so, went out of my way to make sure that she had the contacts she needed to possibly go ahead and end this conservatorship and just end this all for our family," Jamie Lynn said. "If it's going to cause this much discord, why continue it?"

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"It wasn't about agreeing with the conservatorship; everyone has a voice and it should be heard," she added. "So if she wanted to talk to other people, then I did, I set that up. I even spoke to her legal team . . . and that did not end well in my favor. So I did take the steps to help, but how many times can I take the steps without, you know, she has to walk through the door."

Britney Spears and her attorney, Mathew Rosengart, later issued Jamie Lynn a cease-and-desist letter, asserting that her book contained "outrageous claims" about Britney.


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"We write with some hesitation because the last thing Britney wants is to bring more attention to your ill-timed book and its misleading or outrageous claims about her," Rosengart wrote in the letter. "Although Britney has not read and does not intend to read your book, she and millions of her fans were shocked to see how you have exploited her for monetary gain. She will not tolerate it, nor should she."

For years, Britney's personal story has been told by others and showcased as Netflix specials and intimate films. Documentaries like the New York Times' "Framing Britney Spears" and Netflix's "Britney vs. Spears" outlined Spears' prolonged battle with a 13-year-long conservatorship, which came to an end on Nov. 12 of last year. It's about time that Britney claims ownership of her own narrative and finally, takes back control of her life.

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Joy Saha

Joy Saha is an editorial fellow at Salon, covering Culture. She holds a BA in journalism from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Books Brief Britney Spears Conservatorship Jamie Lynn Spears Memoir